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close this book Prevention and treatment of mold in library collections with an emphasis on tropical climates: A RAMP study
View the document Preface
View the document Acknowledgements
close this folder 1. Introduction
View the document 1.1 Climate
View the document 1.2 Materials
View the document 1.3 Modifying the environment
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 2. Mold
View the document 2.1 Structure of mold
close this folder 2.2 Environmental and nutritional factors in growth and survival
View the document 2.2.1 Temperature
View the document 2.2.2 Moisture
View the document 2.2.3 Nutrients
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 3. Implications for library materials
close this folder 3.1 Vulnerability of materials
View the document 3.1.1 Paper - cellulose, sizes, coatings
View the document 3.1.2 Bookcloth
View the document 3.1.3 Leather
View the document 3.1.4 Adhesives
View the document 3.1.5 Film and related materials
close this folder 3.2 Environmental factors
View the document 3.2.1 Circulation
View the document 3.2.2 Relative humidity
View the document 3.2.3 Temperature
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 4. Prevention
close this folder 4.1 Building design and modification
View the document 4.1.1 Location
View the document 4.1.2 Structural considerations in environmental modification
close this folder 4.2 Interior modifications in existing facilities
View the document 4.2.1 Location of stack and storage areas
View the document 4.2.2 Stack arrangement
View the document 4.2.3 Localized environmental modification
View the document 4.2.4 Creating microclimates in cabinets and cases
View the document 4.3 Stack maintenance
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 5. Fungicides and fumigation
View the document 5.1 Fungicides
View the document 5.2 Fumigation
View the document 5.3 Toxicity of fumigants
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 6. Treatment
close this folder 6.1 Small outbreaks - localized high relative humidity
View the document 6.1.1 Books
View the document 6.1.2 Unbound materials (documents, maps, works of art on paper)
View the document 6.1.3 Photographs, negatives and microfilm
View the document 6.1.4 General area
close this folder 6.2 Moderate outbreaks - Major and prolonged periods of high humidity or minor flooding
View the document 6.2.1 Books
View the document 6.2.2 Unbound materials
View the document 6.2.3 Photographs, negatives and microfilm
View the document 6.2.4 General area
close this folder 6.3 Major outbreaks - Major flooding and prolonged exposure
View the document 6.3.1 Priorities and planning
View the document 6.3.2 Prevention of mold growth on site
View the document 6.3.3 Freezing
View the document 6.3.4 Drying
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 7. Equipment and supplies
View the document 7.1 Monitoring equipment
View the document 7.2 Prevention
View the document 7.3 Treatment
View the document 7.4 Emergency treatment
View the document 8. Selected bibliography

2.2 Environmental and nutritional factors in growth and survival

Most of the information available on the growth and development of mold is derived from laboratory cultures rather than on site studies. This information is therefore not always relevant to the growth and development of the same organism in the library environment. It is however, accurate to say that three factors are essential for the growth and survival of molds: the correct temperature, adequate moisture, and proper nutrients. St. George9 notes that it is a common misconception that light is required for mold growth. Unlike most plants, virtually all molds lack chlorophyl and therefore, light plays no role in their development. Colonies thrive in the dark, since for some varieties, exposure to ultra-violet light is injurious or lethal.10