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close this book Prevention and treatment of mold in library collections with an emphasis on tropical climates: A RAMP study
View the document Preface
View the document Acknowledgements
close this folder 1. Introduction
View the document 1.1 Climate
View the document 1.2 Materials
View the document 1.3 Modifying the environment
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 2. Mold
View the document 2.1 Structure of mold
close this folder 2.2 Environmental and nutritional factors in growth and survival
View the document 2.2.1 Temperature
View the document 2.2.2 Moisture
View the document 2.2.3 Nutrients
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 3. Implications for library materials
close this folder 3.1 Vulnerability of materials
View the document 3.1.1 Paper - cellulose, sizes, coatings
View the document 3.1.2 Bookcloth
View the document 3.1.3 Leather
View the document 3.1.4 Adhesives
View the document 3.1.5 Film and related materials
close this folder 3.2 Environmental factors
View the document 3.2.1 Circulation
View the document 3.2.2 Relative humidity
View the document 3.2.3 Temperature
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 4. Prevention
close this folder 4.1 Building design and modification
View the document 4.1.1 Location
View the document 4.1.2 Structural considerations in environmental modification
close this folder 4.2 Interior modifications in existing facilities
View the document 4.2.1 Location of stack and storage areas
View the document 4.2.2 Stack arrangement
View the document 4.2.3 Localized environmental modification
View the document 4.2.4 Creating microclimates in cabinets and cases
View the document 4.3 Stack maintenance
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 5. Fungicides and fumigation
View the document 5.1 Fungicides
View the document 5.2 Fumigation
View the document 5.3 Toxicity of fumigants
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 6. Treatment
close this folder 6.1 Small outbreaks - localized high relative humidity
View the document 6.1.1 Books
View the document 6.1.2 Unbound materials (documents, maps, works of art on paper)
View the document 6.1.3 Photographs, negatives and microfilm
View the document 6.1.4 General area
close this folder 6.2 Moderate outbreaks - Major and prolonged periods of high humidity or minor flooding
View the document 6.2.1 Books
View the document 6.2.2 Unbound materials
View the document 6.2.3 Photographs, negatives and microfilm
View the document 6.2.4 General area
close this folder 6.3 Major outbreaks - Major flooding and prolonged exposure
View the document 6.3.1 Priorities and planning
View the document 6.3.2 Prevention of mold growth on site
View the document 6.3.3 Freezing
View the document 6.3.4 Drying
View the document Literature cited
close this folder 7. Equipment and supplies
View the document 7.1 Monitoring equipment
View the document 7.2 Prevention
View the document 7.3 Treatment
View the document 7.4 Emergency treatment
View the document 8. Selected bibliography

3.2.1 Circulation

Of these three, circulation is one of the most critical, and the most often neglected. The literature often mentions in passing the importance of good air circulation. Unfortunately, the significance of this factor, particularly in areas where the environment is not temperature and humidity controlled, has been largely overlooked. Air movement causes the evaporation of moisture, lowering the surface temperature. This is evident to anyone who has ever experienced the cooling effect of a sudden breeze on a hot still day. Good air circulation in the library results in the evaporation of moisture, lowers the surface temperature, and alters two of the environmental factors on which mold growth depends.

It is, in general, much less expensive to move existing air around, thereby modifying the temperature and humidity than it is to introduce an artificially created supply of air with characteristics radically different than that of the surrounding air. Good air circulation can do much to reduce the problems associated with lack of control of conditions three and four.