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View the documentSession 0: Opening Session
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View the documentSession 12: Supply and Logistics
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View the documentTransparencies

Session 12: Supply and Logistics

Learning Objectives

- To be able to plan properly the supply and logistics component of a UNICEF intervention in an emergency situation.

- To be aware of methods and techniques to achieve a successful supply operation.

- To understand guidelines for mobilizing/developing the logistics capacity necessary to deliver emergency assistance.

- To show how supply and logistics are important elements of pre-disaster planning.

Learning Points

- Preparedness for better planning and prompt delivery of supplies depend on knowledge of:-

1. Sources of supplies/potential suppliers
2. Use of emergency stockpile, UNIPAC
3. Stockpiling in country
4. Transport routes and capacities
5. Transport contractors

- Advantages of local procurement vs. overseas
- Provision of adequate specifications and advantages of set packing
- Donations in kind
- Logistics opportunities
- Pros and cons of trucking supplies (e.g. own fleet vs. contracted)
- Supply/logistic as part of pre-disaster planning
- UNICEF procedures and documentation for SLs/SCFs and telex requests in emergency operations
- Arrangements for monitoring the supply "pipeline"

Possible Learning Methods

- Presentation on supply (with overheads)
- Discussion on region specific issues
- Presentation on logistics (with overheads)
- Group work

Required Reading

- UNICEF, "Assisting in Emergencies", Chapter 14, Annex 30-36, 41, 48-50.

Supplementary Reading

- Fred Cuny, "Basic Logistics Concepts"
- UNHCR, Guide to In-Kind Contributions

Speakers' Preparation Aids

- Gullmar Andersson, "Supply Operations in Emergencies": Overhead transparencies
- UNICEF Field Manual, Book E, Chapter 11
- UNICEF, "Assisting in Emergencies", Chapter 14, Annex 30-36, 41, 48-50

***

Speaker’s Aid

TITLE: Supply Operations in Emergencies
AUTHOR: J. Gullmar Anderson

SESSION: SUPPLY AND LOGISTICS

***

SUPPLY OPERATIONS IN EMERGENCIES
By J. Gullmar Anderson
***

GENERAL

The success or failure of an emergency operation is how efficient the supply logistics component is carried out. Speed and the right thing in the right place at the right time are of utmost importance

PREPAREDNESS

In order to be able to respond quickly to possible needs for local procurement and in-country transportation following the occurrence of an emergency situation, all field offices should endeavor to be prepared in advance by gathering (and keeping up to date) certain basic information. This should, if possible, be done jointly/in coordination with UNDP, other UN agencies and other organizations which might be active in relief work. This is an important function of supply officers in (or otherwise responsible for) disaster-prone countries.

The "pre-disaster" plan should answer the following questions:

a - Who are potential local suppliers of commonly required relief items?
b - What are the main means of transport and routes to disaster-prone areas?
c - Who are the potential transport contractors?
d - What are the possible means of quickly delivering goods procured overseas to the country?

SUPPLY SOURCES

Within our definition there are three main supply sources, namely:

- Local procurement
- Overseas procurement
- Donations in kind.

The procurement and delivery of terms which are available within the country (local procurement) is often the quickest and most effective way of meeting the most immediate needs of an affected population. Where urgently needed items are available from local manufacturers, wholesalers and/or retailers, the procurement and delivery of initial quantities within the first few days, after a disaster strikes, may be a valuable contribution. A few issues should be kept in mind:

a - Avoid upsetting the local market by depleting stocks within the country, thus creating shortages and/or price increases;

b - Coordinate purchases with other agencies in the same "market";

c - If possible, compare prices with overseas procurement keeping in mind freight costs;

d - Bulky items, such as vehicles and bulk supply, are always very expensive to airlift and may therefore be more advantageous to procure locally even if procurement price within the country is extremely high;

e - Keep the time factor in mind (will the whole quantity be needed at once or can parts be delivered later and could be shipped by sea freight).

Where local procurement is not possible, overseas procurement will be necessary. In UNICEF and many other Agencies, we turn first of all to UNIPAC. The UNICEF Procurement and Assembly Centre (UNIPAC) was created in 1984 with the reorganization of the Supply Division, it's forerunner, the UNICEF Packing and Assembly Centre, was established in 1963 to facilitate supply assistance both in terms of procurement and of shipment and distribution to end-user projects in assisted countries. This is made possible by (a) bulk procurement of individual supply items, and (b) set-packing of supplies and equipment for direct distribution to the health centre, school or other institution in the receiving country. Purchases in bulk enable UNICEF to procure supplies directly from the manufacturers at reduced prices, and the savings thus obtained largely offset the cost of the services provided by the Centre. The establishment of the Centre has resulted in increased efficiency in procurement operations, better quality control and a more rapid distribution of supplies within countries.

UNIPAC is an integral part of the Supply Division and is responsible for warehousing and packing as well as the worldwide procurement of project supplies. Procurement of supplies from the Americas is handled through Supply Division, New York.

United Nationa Agencies, governmental as well as non-governmental organizations, may also draw on the supplies and services available from UNIPAC on a reimbursable basis.

UNIPAC Emergency Stockpile

Recently a revision of the UNIPAC Emergency Stockpile has taken place and the implementation will soon be carried out.

The following criteria was developed to improve the stockpile (lists of all items in the stockpile are attached):

a - items to be included should be of type "most commonly used in early stages of an emergency";

b - items more suitable for local procurement should not be included;

c - Consider whether existing items can be favorably replaced by newer and better items;

d - Delete items not commonly used or suitable for their purpose of meeting early emergency needs;

e - Deleted items from the stockpile should not by implication mean deletion as a UNIPAC stock item.

Set-packing for distribution in emergency situations is of a great value to the field. Although it can sometimes be difficult to create a "balanced" set (e.g. drug sets), the logistics advantages are considerable. The WHO basic drug list is of course a good guideline but needs for various kinds of basic drugs do vary from country to country and emergency to emergency. Therefore certain adjustments may be necessary at later stages in the emergency. One of the great advantages with UNIPAC's sets is that the set can be designed to fit the particular need, in other words, one does not need to follow the standard sets designed, but make the necessary adjustments both with regard to items and quantity.

Another issue that can be a bottleneck is when some items in the ordered set are not in stock at UNIPAC. To overcome this problem, an exchange of information is needed between the field and UNIPAC. Often some minor items, that may hold up the packing, can be distributed later or even cancelled to avoid delays.

The third supply source is "donations in kind." I am aware of the excellent UNHCR guide on this matter. I am therefore making in this paper some short general guidelines:

a - After the assessment of needs is carried out and (a) project(s) formulated, the field office should identify supply components suitable for donations in kind;

b - Headquarters should in the appeal spell out that (although cash contributions are preferred), donations in kind of specific items are acceptable;

c - Shipping costs for such donations are normally requested but should not be an absolute requirement;

d - It may be necessary to obtain certain specifications or other criteria through the field office or Supply Division before a request for donations can be forwarded to possible donors;

e - in cases where unsolicited donations in kind are offered by donors, the field office should always be consulted and have the final say in whether the donation is acceptable or not;

f - Items donated should ideally be identical or similar to goods normally used or provided to the affected population;

g - Donated items should not require special storage, preparation or treatment unless specifically requested.

COMMUNICATIONS

In disaster situations, communications (especially in armed conflicts) can be a very difficult problem both within the country and between country office and Headquarters.

The creation of a good radio network, linking concerned government authorities, UN offices, stores and field personnel, is essential.

A good way to know if all communications reach Headquarters and vice versa is to, from day one of an emergency, establish a "sitrep" (situation report) system. This implies that all information, requests, supply call forwards are included in one daily numbered telex. This is the most effective way to be sure of that all communications reach Headquarters. The same applies for communication Headquarters-field. Another advantage is that, when the emergency is over, you have a good recording of all communications (format of sitreps attached).

It could also be mentioned in this chapter that total reliance on electric appliances, such as computer, electric typewriters and calculators, may create severe problems if electricity is cut or rationed.

LOGISTICS IN EMERGENCIES

In emergencies, apart from correctly identifying the needs of a population, speedy deliveries to the affected area are imperative. It is, therefore, of utmost importance that personnel involved in planning emergency projects are paying special attention to the logistics aspect of the projects. It is of no use to ship large quantities of relief supplies to a "port-of-entry" in a given country if the possibilities of on forwarding the commodities have not been ascertained beforehand, in the writer's opinion, UNICEF is doing a very good job in emergencies, but it is believed that we could further improve our logistics operations apart from other sectors of a relief operation.

IDENTIFYING AND QUANTIFYING NEEDS

When a disaster has struck a country or when any other type of emergency situation has developed, the immediate needs and other data should be obtained, i.e.:

- Total population in need of relief;
- Type of assistance needed;
- Quantity of identified items, etc.

It is of little use to plan that the population needs, say, 1,000 MT of relief supplies per month, and later find out that only 500 MT can be moved to the affected area per month. If such a situation arises, it might be necessary to improve the delivery system as a programme component. If, on the other hand, that is not possible, priorities of certain items or components of the relief programme must be considered. Thus, the logistics component must have an important role in the early planning of a relief programme.

PLANNING OF A DELIVERY SYSTEM

There are certainly many problems and "bottlenecks" that cannot be foreseen in an early planning stage, but there are some aspects that one always has to look into:

A. Deliveries of supplies coming from outside the affected country

First of all, the method of transporting the supplies to the country must be determined, which also will give the "port of entry." If supplies are airlifted. It should be determined which airport would be the most suitable considering the proximity to the disaster area, possibilities of on forwarding, storage capacities and customs formalities. If sea freight is considered, apart from what is stated above, capacities of ports must be known taking into consideration not only the foreseen UNICEF supplies, but all cargo handled by the port.

B. Deliveries of supplies coming from inside the affected country

In many instances, this can perhaps ease many logistics problems and establish a quicker delivery but, unfortunately, it is very seldom that this can be done except as a complement in larger emergencies. This is due to availability of items needed and very often the tendency of creating sharp rises in prices local markets are overtaxed.

C. Staging area/storage

It is often not feasible to transport a large tonnage directly to the affected area, the reason being non-availability of adequate storage facilities or other constraints in war situations. A staging area, therefore, might have to be considered either inside or outside the affected country. The minimum requirement would be good port/airport facilities and sufficient storage available. Another criteria would be "easy" access to the disaster area.

D. Delivery system inside the country

A closer look should be taken at the possibilities of moving the supplies within the country and distribution system to reach the affected population. What are the existing possibilities?: road, rail, air, water.

One constraint in moving UNICEF-provided supplies to vulnerable groups is that the government sometimes sees our supplies as "second priority" to deliveries of staple food and other commodities not particularly earmarked for a group of population. This often puts us at a disadvantage in using a government delivery network.

Thanks to the newly established UNICEF policy to pay inland transportation for commodities, we now have a good solution to this problem. Paying inland transportation is looked upon as "project support," but I would like to go a step further and state that providing funds for inland transportation may, in certain cases, be a project in itself. To assist a government with transport in peak situations may be crucial to a successful operation on the whole.

UNICEF should also, in the writer's opinion, take more interest in "pre-disaster" planning in disaster-prone countries. One component in such planning is an inventory of available means of transport and storage facilities within the country. This type of data would provide us with the most useful information on methods of transport and available facilities before a disaster occurs. On the other hand, this information would also be useful for programme officers concerned in regular UNICEF programmes, where we regularly have a transport component. We should not forget that each and every country has for generations been moving goods and personnel in their own way, and we should study this further.

When all transport problems have been solved and one can safely be sure of deliveries to the disaster area, the wide variety of problems connected with the actual distribution of commodities to the beneficiaries have to be tackled. It is very difficult to comment on this issue as the problems vary so much from one emergency to another, but a few general suggestions can, however, be given:

1. Make sure that the Government's "machinery" is able to distribute the commodities in an efficient manner. If need be, UNICEF assistance could be considered to strengthen this by providing funds for employment of staff for a very limited period of time.

2. Try to involve voluntary agencies (foreign or local), local groups, missionaries and the local populations as additional "outlets" for our assistance. This obviously with the agreement of the government concerned.

3. Assure that storage for a limited period of time is available in the area.

4. Plan deliveries either direct or via a staging area not be exceed available storage facilities.

Because all aspects of logistics would be too large to include in this paper, I will therefore limit my comments to a few points:

a - Airfreight

Supplies for immediate (lifesaving) "relief" are needed very urgently and therefore will probably need to be airfreighted, in general, therefore, due to the shipping cost, only urgently needed supplies should be airlifted. There are two exceptions to this rule. First exception can be made for "high value - low volume" items and secondly careful calculations should be done regarding shipments to land-locked countries where trans-shipment can be very expensive.

b - Shipping in containers

Shipping of relief supplies in containers has several advantages. First of all, it is a very good protection of supplies both in transit and in ports.

The possibility of keeping the goods in the container for part of in-land distribution exists. It is not necessary to off-load the container from the truck in this case thus avoiding the requirement of cranes. The contents of the container is simply off-loaded with the container on the truck.

UNICEF has successfully, to a large extent, used so called "one-way" containers. This means that the container is procured and utilized as storage or for other purposes in the disaster area. The advantage is that, by this method, a store can be created anywhere along the logistics chain. Only be aware that a crane is needed to off-load containers.

c - "Bottlenecks"

In all logistics operations regardless how well planned they are, some unforeseen problems or difficulties will always emerge. It is useful, in all relief operation budgets, to set aside some funds to overcome the "bottlenecks."

d - Monitoring

The availability of up-to-date information concerning the progress of procurement, shipment and utilization of supplies, as well as the financial situation, is vital for a successful operation. A monitoring system should therefore be established as of day one in an emergency.

e. Providing vehicles in emergency situations

It is quite common that one of the first requests received is for a fleet of trucks and land rovers to strengthen the government possibilities of moving supplies. As has happened in some emergencies, trucks and land rovers have been airlifted to the country concerned at a very high cost when the country's own available means have not been studied fully. It is very rare that a spectacular airlift with huge C-130 cargo planes with a few trucks and land rovers on board have helped in a relief operation to defend the cost. To take an extreme example, one can hire a very large number of camels for a long time for the cost of airlifting one truck.

In one instance, a relief organization used small aircrafts to air-drop food supplies in a rather inaccessible area of Ethiopia where camel and donkey trains could have moved a larger tonnage per day at a fraction of the cost.

The use of common transport available within the country as in all instances the writer has been associated with, has proved to be both less expensive and more efficient. Another advantage has been the access to a much larger fleet of vehicles than it would have been the case if provided transport had been utilized. As an example, in the programme for East Pakistani refugees in India, approximately 100 truck loads were sent out from Calcutta dally on the "long-haul" destinations. The turn-around time was approximately 6 weeks for each truck. The cost benefit of providing trucks for traveling over such distances, compared with using commercial transport, speaks for itself.

By stating this, it does not mean that a limited number of transport should not be provided, or in some instances an airlift, being the only alternative in a serious situation, but it is to state that all other available possibilities within the country should first be explored.

MONITORING

The beginning of a relief operation is often confused with lack of data on supplies airlifted or otherwise transported to the country, urgent local procurement and at the same time studying or revising requests received. It is therefore of utmost importance that a proper recording/monitoring system is established from the start. The system should be set up in such a way that one at a glance can see what is in the "pipeline," what is in main stores or staging areas and details of supplies in peripheral stores and actually distributed. As it is very difficult to "back-track" and get proper records at a later date, or even to establish where and how much supplies are in each and every place, a monitoring system is a prerequisite to a successful operation.

COORDINATION

In large emergency operations, many different agencies and organizations are involved in the relief work. Therefore, coordination in all aspects is very important including the logistics component. A common feature is sharing chartered aircrafts to transport urgently needed supplies. It is unfortunately less common that the same approach is taken after the supplies have arrived in the country. If full coordination can be achieved, it is a tremendous improvement in the utilization of transport fleets, storage and distribution "outlets."

Another type of coordination should also be mentioned, namely, the coordination between the field office, New York and UNIPAC. I am the first to praise the very efficient way this is functioning with supplies leaving the UNIPAC emergency stockpile within 24 to 48 hours after the action has been initiated by the field office. Sometimes, however, the supplies are arriving after two to three months; in some instances, the late arrival of supplies render them useless for the intended purpose. Personnel involved in planning emergency programmes should determine latest arrival date of requested items and advised ETA by HQs or UNIPAC must be adhered to. A great help in this would be to enquire the availability of needed items in UNIPAC before a call forward is placed. Maybe one possibility would be to have a latest date of delivery, otherwise the call forward would be automatically cancelled.

REHABILITATION

Many of the points raised in this paper are relevant to rehabilitation projects. The aim should be to restore basic services to its pre-disaster level and it is rather common that rehabilitation projects begin during the relief phase of that certain operation while relief activities may continue during a rehabilitation phase.

This will create logistical problems similar to those during the relief phase and, therefore, special attention must be given to logistics.

Another aspect is that the restoration of basic services can be a prerequisite to the termination of relief projects and, therefore, speedy implementation is of utmost importance.

REVISED EMERGENCY STOCKPILE

KIT A
*****

Code

Item

1506002

ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID TAB 300 MG SCORED TIN OF 1000

1555965

PARACETAMOL TABLETS BP SCORED 500 MG TIN OF 1000

1555355

MEBENDAZOLE TABLETS 100 MG BOTTLE OF 100

1560025

PIPERAZINE CITRATE SYRUP USP BOTTLE OF 30 ML

1505085

AMPICILLIN FOR ORAL SUSPENSION USP BOTTLE OF 60 ML

1557982

PENICILLIN G INJ BP 1 MEGA UNIT WITHOUT DILUENT

1543802

DILUENT (DISTILLED WATER FOR INJECTION) BP AMP 5 ML

1559050

PHENOXYMETHYLPENICILLIN TAPS BP 250 MG BOT 100

1559025

PROCAINE BENZYLPENICILLIN INJ 3 G 3 MIL IU

1537100

CO-TRIMOXAZOLE TABLETS BP TIN OF 500

1569000

TETRACYCLINE CAPSULES BP 250 MG TIN OF 1000

1532000

CHLOROQUINE TABLETS 150 MG BASE BP TIN OF 1000

1533397

CHLOROQUINE SYRUP BOTTLE OF 60 ML

1550010

FERROUS SULFATE - FOLIC ACID TABLETS TIN OF 1000

1550000

FERROUS SALT TAB 60 MG BOTTLE OF 1000

1515020

BENZOIC ACID & SALICYCLIC ACID OINT TUBE OF 40 G

1505120

ANTIBIOTIC DERMATOLOGICAL OINTMENT TUBE OF 20 G

1523000

CALAMINE LOTION 500 ML

1520000

BENZYL-BENZOATE SAPONATED CONC BOTTLE OF 1 LTR

1552002

GENTIAN VIOLET POWDER MEDICINAL BP BOTTLE OF 25 GR

1531500

CHLORHEXIDINE CONC SOLUTION 20% BPC BTL OF 100 ML

1504000

ALUMINUM HYDROXIDE 1000 TABS TIN

1562500

SENNA TABLETS 7, 5 MG TIN OF 100

1561105

SALTS ORAL REHYDRATION POWDER FOR 1 LITRE

1510000

TETRACYCLINE 1% EYE OINTMENT

1543800

DILUENT (DISTILLED WATER FOR INJECTION) BP AMP 2 ML

1543804

DILUENT (DISTILLED WATER FOR INJECTION) BP AMP 10 ML

1583000

VITAMIN A- CAPS HIGH POTENCY 200,000 IU BOTTLE OF 500

1583010

VITAMIN A (25,000 IU) BOTTLE OF 100

REVISED EMERGENCY STOCKPILE

KIT C
*****

Code

Item

782200

SYRINGUE HYPO 2 ML LUER DISPOSABLE

6700378

SYRINGUE HYPO 10 ML LUER DISPOSABLE

747430

NEEDLE HYPO 0.80x40M/21Gx1-1/2" LUER DISPOSABLE

6700379

NEEDLE HYPO 0,5x16MM/G25x5/8

783500

SYRINGUE HYPO 2 ML LUER GLASS

784500

SYRINGUE HYPO 10 ML LUER GLASS

749000

NEEDLE HYPO 1,25x51MM/18Gx2" LUER BOX OF 12

752000

NEEDLE HYPO 0,90x38MM/20Gx1-1/2" LUER BOX OF 12

749500

NEEDLE HYPO 0,90x51MM/20Gx2" LUER BOX OF 12

750500

NEEDLE HYPO 0,70x32MM/22Gx1-1/4" LUER BOX OF 12

751000

NEEDLE HYPO 0,55x19MM/24Gx3/4" LUER BOX OF 12

751502

NEEDLE HYPO 0,45x10MM/26Gx3/8" LUER BOX OF 12

522000

GAUZE-PAD STERILE 12-PLY 76x76 MM SQUARE

563000

SUTURE CATGUT

742990

HOLDER NEEDLE STRAIGHT METZENBAUM BABY 150 MM SS

745000

KNIFE-HANDLE SURGICAL FOR MINOR SURGERY NO 3

727500

FORCEPS HEMOSTAT STRAIGHT ROCHESTER-PEAN 160 MM SS

720500

FORCEPS DISSECTING SPRING-TYPE CVD FINE 115 MM SS

746000

KNIFE-BLADE SURGICAL FOR MINOR SURGERY NO 10 PKT OF 5

773500

SCISSORS SURGICAL STRAIGHT 140 MM S/B SS

774000

SCISSORS SURGICAL STRAIGHT 140 MM S/S SS

774500

SCISSORS SURGICAL STRAIGHT 140 MM B/B SS

774640

SCISSORS SUTURE BABY 114 MM SHARP POINTS SS

481050

THERMOMETER CLINICAL ORAL DUAL CELS/FAHR SCALE

481060

THERMOMETER CLINICAL RECTAL DUAL CELS/FAHR SCALE

686000

STETHOSCOPE BINAURAL COMPLETE

686500

STETHOSCOPE FOETAL PINARD MONAURAL

683000

SPHYGMOMANOMETER ANEROID 300 MM WITH CUFF

661000

OTOSCOPE-OPHTALMOSCOPE-SET W/O BATTERIES

1802212

BATTERY ALKALINE DRY CELL "D" TYPE 1,5 v (2)

777500

SPECULUM VAGINAL BI-VALVE GRAVES MEDIUM SS

778000

SPECULUM VAGINAL BI-VALVE GRAVES LARGE SS

783000

SYRINGE IRRIGATING KRAMER 90 ML METAL

620000

TONGUE-DEPRESSOR 165 MM METAL

373500

TUBE NASAL-FEEDING PREMATURE 5FR 380 MM POLYETHYLENE

373000

TUBE NASAL-FEEDING INFANT 8FR 380 MM POLYETHYLENE

744500

INFUSION SET PAED SCALP VEIN STERILE/DISPOSABLE

328000

GLOVES SURGEON'S LATEX SIZE 6-1/2

328500

GLOVES SURGEON'S LATEX SIZE 7

329500

GLOVES SURGEON'S LATEX SIZE 8

276500

TRAY INSTRUMENT/DRESSING W/COVER 310x195x63 MM SS

210000

BASIN KIDNEY 475 ML (16 OZ) STAINLESS STEEL

256000

JAR, NEEDLE OR OINTMENT WITH COVER & HANDLE 180 ML

225000

BOWL SPONGE 600 ML STAINLESS STEEL

6700381

GAUZE SWABS 5x5 CM IN PKTS OF 100

6700382

GAUZE SWABS 10x10 CM IN PKTS OF 100

6700383

STERILE GAUZE SWABS 10x10 CM IN PKTS OF 5

6700384

EYE PADS (STERILE) IN PKTS OF 10

6700385

PARAFFIN GAUZE DRESSINGS 10x10 CM TIN OF 26

6700386

SANITARY TOWELS PKTS OF 20

519600

COTTON WOOL ABSORBENT NON STERILE 500 G

501050

PLASTER, SURGICAL ADHESIVE TAPE 25 MM x 10 M

512100

BANDAGE GAUZE NON STERILE 25 MM X 9 M

512101

BANDAGE GAUZE NON STERILE 50 MM X 9 M

512102

BANDAGE GAUZE NON STERILE 75 MM X 9 M

541050

PLASTER OF PARIS BANDAGE BPC 3 INCHES X 3 YARDS

6700387

PNEUMATIC SPLINT SET, MULTIPURPOSE

539000

PINS SAFETY MEDIUM SIZE/40 MM BAG OF 12

575000

TOWEL HUCK 430 x 500 MM

552000

SOAP TOILET 113 G BAR UNWRAPPED

514000

BRUSH HAND SURGEON'S WHITE NYLON BRISTLES

6700545

HEALTH CARDS WITH PLASTIC ENVELOPES

1544825

ENVELOPES FOR TABLETS POLYTHENE PKTS OF 100

361000

SHEETING PLASTIC CLEAR VINYL 910 MM WIDE

305000

APRON UTILITY 900 MM x 1 M OPAQUE PLASTIC

690000

TAPE MEASURE 2M/6 FEET CALIBRATED CM/INCHES STEEL

140500

SCALE PHYSICIAN ADULT METRIC 140 KILOS X 100 G

145530

SCALE INFANT CLINIC METRIC SCOOP 10 KILOS X 20 G

114000

HAMPER LINENE FOLDING WITHOUT BAGS

114200

BAG/LINER FOR LINEN HAMPER 114000

156000

STERILIZER DRESSING PRESS CKR 350 x 280 MM/39L FUEL

170000

STOVE KEROSENE SINGLE BURNER PRESSURE TYPE

REVISED EMERGENCY STOCKPILE

Code

Item

SHELTER MATERIAL

5003502

BLANKET COTTON 1.5 X 2 M EMERGENCY USE

5003505

BLANKET WOOL-BLEND EMERGENCY 1.5 X 2 M ADULT SIZE

0512600

BLANKET, BABY 910 X 1270 MM ALL-COTTON

5086010

TARPAULIN-MATERIAL W/EYELETS 4 X 50 M POLYETHYLENE

5070000

ROPE ALL-PURPOSE & FOR TARPAULINS 5086010 7.6 M

5088005

TENT FOR HOSPITAL USE 80 SQM (10 BEDS)

5010000

COT FOLDING M/COTTON COVER ADULT SIZE

0537200

NETTING MOSQUITO NYLON 2.4 M WIDE

COOKING UTENSILS

2036510

COOKING-SET EMERGENCY USE FAMILY-SIZE 12 PIECES

0170000

STOVE KEROSENE SINGLE BURNER PRESSURE TYPE

COOKING POT 50 LITRES CAPACITY

COOKING POT 100 LITRES CAPACITY

4633400

JUG MEASURING 2 LTR X 100 POLYPROPYLENE

2065000

LADLE KITCHEN (DIPPER) 250 ML SS

2170000

PAIL WITH BAIL HANDLE 10 LTR POLYETHYLENE

2051400

BOWL SOUP 385 ML CAPACITY MELAMINE

2054000

BOWL-PLATES-CUTLERY NESTED SET OF 5 PIECES

2051420

CUTLERY (TABLEWARE) SS SET OF 4 PIECES

2069000

MUG DRINKING 350 ML MELAMINE

2076200

PLATE SOUP DIAM 250 MM HEAVY-DUTY MELAMINE

COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT

1888000

TRANSMITTER-RECEIVER TWO-WAY (WALKIE/TALKIE)

BASESTATION

RADIOSET FOR CAR

ANTENNA

KITS

FEEDING-SET FOR 250 CHILDREN (SEE PAGE 12)

9960000

STERILIZATION-KIT FOR SURG INSTRUMENTS/DRESSINGS

9962000

SURGICAL-INSTRUMENT-KIT MAJOR

9662005

SURGICAL-INSTRUMENT-KIT MINOR

MISCELLANEOUS

0552000

SOAP TOILET 113 G BAR UNWRAPPED

FLASHLIGHT, STRONG, POWERFUL

1555500

K-MIX-II + VITAMIN A 10 BAGS OF 2 KG PER CARTON

1555502

VEGETABLE OIL FOR K-MIX-II CANS OF 4 KG

0180000

STRETCHER ARMY TYPE FOLDING

0324970

CUP MEDICINE 30 ML POLYPROPYLENE

0361000

SHEETING PLASTIC CLEAR VINYL 910 MM WIDE

WATERPURIFICATION CHEMICAL 1 TABLET/1 LITRE

WATERPURIFICATION CHEMICAL 1 TABLET/5 LITRES

WATERPURIFICATION CHEMICAL 1 SACHET/1000 LITRES

COLLAPSIBLE WATER CONTAINER

2289405

SHEETING COTTON WIDTH 1.45 M +/- 2 CM

5028000

LANTERN HURRICANE NON-PRESSURE KEROSENE 240 ML

0532300

LANTERN KEROSENE PRESSURE 1.183 LTR/2.5 PINT 400 ML

EMERGENCY OPERATING LIGHT

5675000

TANK WATER COLLAPSIBLE 5000 LTR W/CARRYING BAG

5675001

BAG-CARRYING FOR WATER TANK 5675000

GRINDING MILL, FAMILY SIZE

GRINDING MILL, CAMP-SIZE

GENERATING-SET 10 KVA

1800345

GENERATING-SET GASOLINE 2000 W 120/240 V 50/60 HZ

1802212

BATTERY ALKALINE DRY CELL "D" TYPE 1.5 V

* also included in "C" kit

DAILY EVALUATION FORM

Day _______________
Session ____________

1. In your view, what were the key points learned in this session?

2. Comment on the application of these within UNICEF and your situation.

3. Suggest any additional critical points that should have been covered.

4. Do you have comments on the suggested reading?

Suggest any additional information sources for sessions of the day.
Texts:
Persons:
Case Studies:
Film:
Other:

5. Comment on the learning methodology (lectures, group work, films) used in the session.