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close this bookDisaster Management Ethics - Trainer's Guide - 1st Edition (Disaster Management Training Programme, 104 p.)
close this folderTOPIC 2: Providing humanitarian assistance to displaced populations and refugees
View the document(introduction...)
View the document21. Introduction
View the document22. Three types of ethical dilemmas
View the document23. Ethical issues
View the document24. More ethical issues
View the document25. Ethical Issue #1
View the document26. Ethical Issue #2
View the document27. Ethical Issue #3
View the document28. Ethical Issue #4
View the document29. Ethical Issue #5
View the document30. Ethical Issue #6
View the document31. Ethical Issue #7
View the document32. Ethical Issue #8
View the document33. Ethical Issue #9
View the document34. Ethical Issue #10
View the document35. Summary

27. Ethical Issue #3


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Maintaining "neutrality" or working on only one side of a conflict

Relief agencies may choose to work on all sides of the conflict, arguing that this demonstrates impartiality and enables them a fuller perspective. Such an approach may generate distrust and hostility from all, although it can provide substantial levers for supplying assistance. The advantage of working on one side only is the need to convince only one party; this is most effective when the agency's beneficiaries are allied to the authorities of that party.