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close this bookLogistics - Trainer's Guide - 1st Edition (Disaster Management Training Programme, 51 p.)
close this folderPART 2: STRUCTURE AND ORGANIZATION OF RELIEF LOGISTICS (30 minutes)
View the document9. THE FLOW OF TRANSPORT AND GOODS
View the document10. TYPICAL LOGISTICS SYSTEM
View the document11. FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
View the document12. OPERATIONAL & SUPPORT FUNCTIONS
View the document13. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES
View the document14. UNITARY STRUCTURE
View the document15. FIELD DISTRIBUTION

9. THE FLOW OF TRANSPORT AND GOODS


Figure

Explain the concept of a supply chain as applicable to all relief programs. Explain the difference between the long haul and forward supply divisions of the supply chain.


The logistics chain

10. TYPICAL LOGISTICS SYSTEM


Figure

Explain the diagram on the overhead. Be careful to note that this is a generalized scheme of a bulk logistics systems only and not a representation of any particular operation.

If time allows, divide the participants into regional or country groups and ask them to make a similar diagram that describes an actual (present or past) logistical operation in their regions. If no-one in a group is familiar enough to diagram a real situation, ask that group to design an ideal system incorporating realities of their own region.


Figure

11. FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT


Figure

Ask for examples of both large and small scale relief logistics operations and the extent of the facilities needed to manage them. Have some examples ready to fill in the discussion. Use the overhead to check that all items have been mentioned.

Depending on the size of the operation, logistics programs may require:


offices and administrative equipment

warehousing

fuel stores and workshops

vehicle parks and checkpoints

personal; vehicles for staff

truck fleets and specialized moving & handling equipment

communications equipment

accommodations for field personnel

12. OPERATIONAL & SUPPORT FUNCTIONS


Figure

Discuss the tasks and functions needed for the logistics operations listed on the overhead. Do all of these functions need to be covered regardless of the size of the operation?

What are the repercussions of neglecting any aspect? Can the participants think of any functions not already mentioned?


Director/Senior Management

Central Support

Procurement

Port Clearance

Warehousing

Transport

Scheduling

Commodity Control

Terminal Distribution

13. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES


Figure

Explain the types of management structures usually encountered in logistics operations, (loose structures, governmental structures, and unitary structures). Poll the participants for any other structures of logistics management they have encountered.

What structures do the local or regional governments offer for a relief logistics operation? What problems can the participants foresee in separating the management of the general national transport network from the emergency relief logistics network?


Loose

Governmental

Unitary

Others?

14. UNITARY STRUCTURE


Figure

Discuss the meaning of a unitary organization as it applies to logistics. Is this concept a realistic one, and if not, why not?


A Unitary Logistics Organization

15. FIELD DISTRIBUTION


Figure

Discuss the perception of the distribution of commodities to people in need as distinct from the transport and handling of bulk consignments. Ask participants to discuss why the distribution aspect of the logistics operation is difficult to control by the unitary structure method and what problems might occur.

Use the overhead to refer to distribution as the “end of the chain.”


Figure