Cover Image
close this bookDisaster Rescue - Australian Emergency Manual (Natural Disaster Organization, 183 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAMENDMENT LIST
View the documentFOREWORD
View the documentPREFACE
close this folderCHAPTER ONE - ORGANISATION, PLANNING AND EQUIPMENT
View the documentDisaster Rescue
View the documentThe Aim
View the documentFunctions
View the documentNote On First Aid Training
close this folderThe Psychology of Rescue
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View the documentRescue Workers
View the documentPersonal Traits of the Rescuer
View the documentPersonal Behaviour
View the documentTeam Composition
close this folderThe Rescue Plan
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View the documentThe Appreciation Process
View the documentContinuing Action
close this folderRescue By Stages
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View the documentStage 1 - Clearance of Surface Casualties
View the documentStage 2 - Rescue of Lightly Trapped
View the documentStage 3 - Exploration of Likely Survival Points
View the documentCalling and Listening Techniques (Figure 1:1)
View the documentStage 4 - Selected Debris Removal
View the documentStage 5 - Total Debris Clearance
View the documentEquipment
View the documentAnnex A to Chapter 1 - Equipment List
close this folderCHAPTER TWO - SAFETY IN TRAINING AND OPERATIONS
View the documentSafety in Training and Operations
View the documentBasic Precautions
View the documentProtective Clothing and Safety
View the documentCasualty Safety
View the documentVehicle Safety
View the documentEquipment Safety
View the documentPublic Utility Hazards
View the documentThe Responsibility for Safety
close this folderCorrect Lifting Techniques
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View the documentCorrect Lifting - Single Rescuer (Figure 2:1)
View the documentCorrect Lifting - Rescue Teams
View the documentAide-Memoire to Correct Lifting
close this folderCHAPTER THREE - ROPES, CHAINS AND SLINGS
View the documentRopes, Chains and Slings
View the documentTerminology
close this folderNatural Fibre Ropes
View the documentMaterial
View the documentConstruction (Figure 3:3)
View the documentSafe Working Loads
View the documentInspection of Laid Rope
View the documentCare and Maintenance
View the documentCoiling Natural Fibre Ropes
close this folderSynthetic Fibre Ropes
View the documentMaterials
View the documentConstruction
View the documentSafe Working Loads
View the documentInspection
View the documentCare and Maintenance
View the documentPrecautions In Operations
View the documentClimbing Tape
View the documentSteel Wire Rope (SWR) - Safe Working Loads (Figure 3:11)
close this folderPrecautions in Operations
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View the documentInspection of Wire Rope
View the documentStorage of Wire Rope
View the documentRecords
close this folderChains and Slings
View the documentChain Slings
View the documentInspection Of Chain Slings
View the documentWire Rope Slings and Natural Fibre Rope Slings
View the documentPrecautions in Operations
View the documentSling Loading Angles (Figure 3:12)
View the documentHook Mousing
close this folderKnots
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View the documentThumb Knot (Figure 3:16)
View the documentFigure of Eight Knot (Figure 3:17)
View the documentDouble Sheet Bend (Figure 3:18)
View the documentBuntline Hitch (Figure 3:19)
View the documentFisherman's Bend (Figure 3:20)
View the documentDouble Fisherman's Knot (Figure 3:21)
View the documentHalf Hitch (Figure 3:22)
View the documentClove Hitch (Figures 3:23 & 3:24)
View the documentRound Turn and Two Half Hitches (Figure 3:25)
View the documentTimber Hitch (Figures 3:26 & 3:27)
View the documentFigure of Eight Loop/Figure of Eight On the Bight (Figures 3:28 & 3:29)
View the documentBowline (Figure 3:30)
View the documentBowline on the Bight (Figure 3:31)
close this folderChair Knot (Figures 3:32 & 3:33)
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View the documentAttaching Chair Knot to Block Hook (Figure 3:33)
View the documentPortuguese Bowline (Figure 3:34)
View the documentKnot Safety
View the documentKnot Strengths
close this folderLashings
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View the documentTerminology
View the documentSquare Lashing (Figure 3:35)
View the documentDiagonal Lashing (Figure 3:36)
View the documentRound Lashing (Figure 3:37)
View the documentFigure of Eight Lashing (Figure 3:38)
close this folderCHAPTER FOUR - LADDERS
View the documentLadders
View the documentTerminology
View the documentConstruction
View the documentCare And Maintenance
View the documentAngle of Ladders When Raised
View the documentSecuring the Head of the Ladder
View the documentSecuring the Foot of the Ladder
View the documentLadder Climbing (Figure 4:3)
View the documentErecting and Extending the Ladder (Three Rescuers) (Figure 4:4)
View the documentErecting and Extending the Ladder (Two Rescuers) (Figure 4:5)
View the documentHalving Ladders
close this folderCHAPTER FIVE - CASUALTY HANDLING
View the documentCasualty Handling
View the documentClassification of Casualties
close this folderStretchers
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderPreparing the Folding or Pole Stretcher
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View the documentBlanketing The Stretcher
View the documentTwo Blanket Method (Figure 5:3)
View the documentSingle Blanket Method (Figure 5:4)
View the documentImprovised 'Blanketing'
View the documentStretcher Lashing
close this folderStretcher Lashing - Coma Position
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View the documentBlanketing - Coma Position
View the documentLashing - Coma Position (Figure 5:8)
close this folderPreparing the Basket Stretcher
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View the documentBlanketing the Basket Stretcher
View the documentSecuring a Basket Stretcher with Securing Straps
View the documentSecuring a Basket Stretcher By Lashing (Figures 5:10, 5:11 & 5:12)
close this folderImprovised Stretchers
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View the documentDoors (Figure 5:13)
View the documentBlankets (Figure 5:14)
View the documentBags (Figure 5:15)
View the documentOvercoats (Figure 5:16)
View the documentLadders (Figure 5:17)
View the documentOther Methods (Figures 5:18 & 5:19)
close this folderLoading a Stretcher
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentThe Four Rescuer Method (Figure 5:20)
View the documentBlanket Lift (Four or Six Rescuers) (Figure 5:21)
View the documentClothing Lift (Three Rescuers) (Figure 5:22)
View the documentWebbing Bands (Five Rescuers) (Figures 5:23 & 5:24)
close this folderRescue Techniques Using No Equipment
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close this folderOne Rescuer Handling Techniques
View the documentSingle Rescuer Human Crutch
View the documentPick-a-Back (Figure 5:26)
View the documentArm Lift (Figure 5:27)
View the documentFirefighter's Crawl (Figure 5:28)
View the documentRemoval Down Stairs Method (Figure 5:29)
View the documentHelping a Casualty Down a Ladder (Figure 5:30)
close this folderTwo Rescuer Handling Techniques
View the documentTwo Rescuer Human Crutch (Figure 5:31)
View the documentTwo Handed Seat (Figure 5:32)
View the documentThree Handed Seat (Figure 5:33)
View the documentFour Handed Seat (Figure 5:34)
View the documentThe Fore and Aft Method (Figure 5:35)
close this folderMoving a Stretcher Over Debris
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View the documentUsing Six Rescuers (Figure 5:36)
View the documentUsing Four Rescuers
View the documentMoving a Stretcher in a Confined Spaces
View the documentPassing a Stretcher Over a Gap
close this folderCHAPTER SIX - LIFTING EQUIPMENT
close this folderLevers
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View the documentFulcrum Blocks
close this folderHydraulic Rescue Equipment
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View the documentContents of Basic Kit
View the documentKit Options - 20 tonne lift and 5 tonne pull rams, ram extension tubes
View the documentMethod of Operation
View the documentThe Components
View the documentSpecial Features of the Equipment
View the documentSafety Points
close this folderMaintenance
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View the documentAir in the System
View the documentBlank Caps
View the documentAccessories
View the documentMechanical Jacks
close this folderAir Bags (High Pressure)
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View the documentSafety Warning
View the documentAir Bag Advantages
View the documentSet Up and Operation
View the documentPrecautions in Lifting Operations
close this folderCHAPTER SEVEN - BLOCKS AND TACKLE AND WINCHES
close this folderBlocks and Tackle
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View the documentTerminology
View the documentTypes of Blocks
View the documentReeving a Tackle (Figure 7:5)
close this folderMechanical Advantage
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View the documentLifting Tackle
View the documentHauling Tackle
View the documentTypes of Tackle
View the documentLength of Rope Required for Tackle
View the documentAnti-Twisters (Figure 7:7)
View the documentPrecautions in Operations
close this folderTirfor Style Winch
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View the documentPrecautions In Operations
View the documentSafety Features
View the documentThe Ratchet Winch (Figure 7:8)
close this folderVehicle Mounted Power Winches
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View the documentPrecautions In Operations
View the documentThe Power Take Off Winch (Mechanical Spool)
View the documentThe Power Take Off Winch (Mechanical Capstan)
View the documentThe Electrically Powered Spool Winch
close this folderCHAPTER EIGHT - ANCHORS AND HOLDFASTS
close this folderAnchorage
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View the documentPrecautions In Operations
View the documentNatural Anchors
close this folderConstructed Holdfasts
View the documentPicket Holdfasts
View the documentPicket Lashings (Figure 8:2)
View the documentBuried Holdfasts (Figure 8:3)
View the documentLog and Picket Holdfast (Figure 8:4)
View the documentImprovised Holdfasts
close this folderCHAPTER NINE - DERRICKS, SHEERS, AND GYNS
View the documentDerricks, Sheers, and Gyns
close this folderStanding Derrick (Figure 9:1)
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View the documentLayout and Preparation
View the documentRaising
View the documentLuffing
close this folderSheer Legs (Figure 9:2)
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View the documentLayout and Preparation
View the documentRaising
View the documentLuffing
close this folderGyns or Tripods (Figure 9:3)
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View the documentLayout and Preparation
View the documentRaising
close this folderCHAPTER TEN - RESCUE FROM HEIGHTS AND DEPTHS
View the documentRescue from Heights and Depths
View the documentImprovised Single Point Lowers (Figures 10:1 and 10:2)
View the documentStretchers in Rescue
View the documentTwo-Point Vertical Suspension (Figure 10:3)
View the documentFour-Point Horizontal Suspension (Figure 10:4)
View the documentLadder Hinge (Figure 10:5)
View the documentLadder Slide (Figure 10:6)
View the documentLeaning Ladder (Figures 10:7 and 10:8)
View the documentLadder Derrick (Figures 10:9 and 10:10)
close this folderMechanical Descents
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View the documentThe Karabiner (Figure 10:11)
close this folderThe Figure '8' Descender (Figure 10:12)
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View the documentThe Basic Hook-Up (Figure 10:13)
close this folderThe Whaletail Descender (Figure 10:14)
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View the documentRigging the Whaletail (Figure 10:15)
View the documentPrecautions In Operations
View the documentLowering Operations (Figures 10:16 and 10:17)
View the documentGuide And Safety Lines
View the documentThe Jib (Figures 10:18 and 10:19)
close this folderFlying Fox (Figures 10:20, 10:21 & 10:22)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPrecautions In Operations
View the documentConstruction
close this folderCHAPTER ELEVEN - DAMAGE TO BUILDINGS, DEBRIS CLEARANCE AND TUNNELLING
View the documentDamage to Buildings
close this folderTypes of Buildings
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentUnframed Buildings (Load Bearing Walls) (Figure 11:1)
View the documentPartially Framed Buildings (Figure 11:2)
View the documentFully Framed Buildings (Figure 11:3)
View the documentMonolithic Buildings (Figure 11:4)
close this folderTypes of Collapse (Figures 11:5, 11:6 & 11:7)
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View the documentThe 'V' Type Collapse (Figure 11:5)
View the documentThe 'Lean-To' Collapse (Figure 11:6)
View the documentThe 'Horizontal' Collapse (Figure 11:7)
close this folderPrecautions in Operations
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View the documentGas (Domestic and LPG)
View the documentWater
View the documentSewers
View the documentElectricity
View the documentCrush Injuries
close this folderDebris Clearance
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View the documentWhen Debris Clearance is Necessary
View the documentMethods of Debris Clearance
View the documentPrecautions in Operations
close this folderDebris Tunnelling
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View the documentTunnel Sizes and Precautions
View the documentTimbering and Lining Tunnels
close this folderLifelines
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View the documentLifeline Signals
View the documentTrenching
View the documentBreaching Walls
close this folderCHAPTER TWELVE - TEMPORARY SHORING AND ELEMENTARY DEMOLITION
close this folderTemporary Shoring
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View the documentFolding Wedges (Figure 12:2)
close this folderTypes of Shore
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View the documentRaking Shore (Figures 12:3, 12:4, 12:5 and 12:6)
View the documentFlying Shore (Figure 12:6 & 12:7)
View the documentDead Shore (Figure 12:9)
View the documentStrutting of Openings (Figure 12:9)
View the documentElementary Demolition
close this folderCHAPTER THIRTEEN - LIGHTING AND POWER EQUIPMENT
View the documentGenerators
close this folderPrecautions in Operations
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentElectrical Safety Precautions
View the documentGenerator Operational Checks
View the documentGenerator Maintenance
View the documentStorage
close this folderLighting
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPositioning Lighting
close this folderCHAPTER FOURTEEN - CUTTING EQUIPMENT
View the documentCutting Equipment
close this folderHand Tools for Cutting
View the documentBolt Cutters
View the documentHack Saw
View the documentThe Axe
View the documentHand Saws
View the documentCutting With Oxy-Acetylene
View the documentChain Saws
close this folderHydraulic Cutters (Figure 14:1)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPrecautions in Operations
close this folderMotor Driven Saws
View the documentRotary Saws (Metal and Masonry Cutting) (Figure 14:2)
View the documentCircular Saws (Wood Cutting)
View the documentReciprocating Saws (Jig Saws) (Figure 14:3)
close this folderCHAPTER FIFTEEN - FIRES AND ELEMENTARY FIRE FIGHTING
View the documentResponsibility for Fire Fighting
close this folderThe Chemistry of Fire (Figure 15:1)
View the documentDefinition
View the documentChemistry
close this folderThe Chemistry of Fire Extinction (Figure 15:2)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentCooling
View the documentSmothering
View the documentStarvation
View the documentClasses of Fire
View the documentFire Fighting Appliances (Refer Annex A)
close this folderCharacteristics, Operation and Application
View the documentWater Type (Stored Pressure)
View the documentFoam Type (Stored Pressure)
View the documentVapourising Liquid Type
View the documentDry Chemical Type (Stored Pressure)
View the documentCarbon Dioxide (CO²) Type
View the documentHose Reels
View the documentHazards Associated with BCF
View the documentAction to be Taken by a Person Discovering a Fire
View the documentWorking and Moving in Smoke
View the documentAnnex A to Chapter 15 - Portable Fire Extinguisher Selection Chart
View the documentREFERENCES

(introduction...)

3.26 Rescue personnel should be familiar with the following knots and by constant practice learn how to make and adapt them with speed and proficiency. Knots must always be tied tightly, dressed down and inspected. Remember, a knot that does not look right almost certainly is incorrectly tied.