Cover Image
close this bookCommunity Emergency Planning Guide - Australian Emergency Manual (Natural Disaster Organization, 78 p.)
close this folderCHAPTER FIVE - MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE
Open this folder and view contentsGeneral
View the documentFunctional Sub-Committees
Open this folder and view contentsEmergency Operations Centre (EOC)
View the documentCommunications
View the documentSummary

Hierarchy of Plans

5.01 A hierarchy of plans normally exists within which plans at lower levels dovetail into plans at the next highest level, as shown in Figure 5:1.


Figure 5:1 HIERARCHY OF PLANS

5.02 An agreed emergency management system should apply at all levels for planning and operations. The system should encompass the everyday operational structures of emergency management organisations, and must be compatible with arrangements at State/Territory level.

Management Framework

5.03 The structure provides a framework that:

a. identifies risks and potential vulnerability;

b. takes action to eliminate or reduce existing hazards, and prevents development of future hazards;

c. identifies emergency management requirements and creates an inventory of community resources which can satisfy requirements;

d. determines roles and responsibilities of the various organisations and agencies which contribute to emergency management requirements;

e. designs, plans and implements measures to meet prevention, preparedness, response and recovery needs in a cooperative and coordinated fashion; and

f. provides regular tests, reviews and updating of plans and arrangements.

Command, Control and Coordination

5.04 In particular, it is the management structure which prescribes command, control and coordination arrangements to apply during multi-service operations. These arrangements are:

a. Command - Direction of members and resources of an organisation in performance of its agreed roles and tasks. Authority to command is established in legislation or by agreement within an organisation. Command relates to an organisation and operates vertically within it.

b. Control - Overall direction of emergency management activities in a designated emergency situation. Authority for control is established in legislation or in an emergency plan, and carries with it responsibility for tasking and coordinating other organisations in accordance with the needs of the situation. Control relates to situations and operates horizontally across organisations.

c. Coordination - Bringing together organisations to ensure effective emergency management response and recovery, and is primarily concerned with systematic acquisition and application of resources (people, material, equipment etc) in accordance with requirements imposed by the threat or impact of a emergency. Coordination relates primarily to resources and operates vertically within an organisation (as a function of the authority to command), and horizontally across organisations (as a function of the authority to control).

Activation

5.05 Determination of who activates these arrangements will reflect individual State/Territory legislation/government direction. Although State/Territory arrangements will be followed locally, the activation process will be detailed by community planning committees.

Functional Sub-Committees

5.06 The planning committee will need to determine whether any specialist functions will be required to be performed in support of the main community plan. These functions may include:

a. medical;
b. communications;
c. rescue;
d. welfare;
e. transport;
f. engineering; and
g. agriculture.

5.07 It may be necessary to form functional planning sub-committees, responsible to the main planning committee, to prepare and maintain supporting plans covering essential functions.

5.08 Where the resources of an organisation are multi-functional, that organisation may be represented on more than one sub-committee. A representative of each functional sub-committee is a member of the main planning committee.

(introduction...)

5.09 The emergency operations centre is a facility for control of operations and coordination of resources. It is the focus of the community emergency management structure.

Considerations

5.10 The establishment, location, staffing and activation of the EOC must be considered by the planning group and included in the main plan.

Communications

5.11 It is vital to establish an effective communications system, connecting all relevant agencies.

Summary

5.12 A hierarchy of plans normally exists, within which plans at lower levels dovetail into plans at the next higher level.

5.13 An agreed emergency management structure for planning and operations should apply at each level. This structure prescribes command, control and coordination arrangements to apply during multi-service operations.

5.14 The planning committee must determine whether any specialist functions need to be performed in support of the main community plan, and prepare supporting plans covering these functions.

5.15 Essential components of the community emergency management structure are:

a. a functioning Emergency Operation Centre (EOC); and
b. an effective communications system connecting all agencies with primary and support roles.