Cover Image
close this bookActivity, Energy Expenditure and Energy Requirements of Infants and Children (International Dietary Energy Consultative Group - IDECG, 1989, 412 pages)
close this folderThe relationship between undernutrition, activity levels and development in young children
close this folder5. Preliminary findings from a study of nutritional supplementation and psychosocial stimulation of stunted children
View the document(introductory text...)
View the document5.1. Developmental levels
View the document5.2. Activity levels
View the document5.3. Relationship between activity and development
View the document5.4. Dietary intakes
View the document5.5. Conclusions

5.4. Dietary intakes

Two 24-hour dietary recalls were obtained from the guardians of the children (WALKER, POWELL and GRANTHAM-McGREGOR 1990). The recalls were taken on weekdays, when the children were well. The total energy and protein intakes were similar in both groups. However, when they were expressed per kilogram body weight, the stunted group actually had significantly higher intakes both in energy and protein than the non-stunted group (Table 7). This finding requires further investigation.

Table 7. Energy and protein intakes upon enrollment


Stunted

Non-stunted


(n = 129)

(n = 62)


Mean

SD

Mean

SD

Energy

(kcal/d)

953

448

973

358


(kcal/kg/d)

113

51 ++

85

31

Protein

(g/d)

26.6

17.8

29.0

14.1


(g/kg/d)

3.1

1.9 +

2.5

1.2

+ p < 0.005
++ p < 0.0001

A higher rate of morbidity in the stunted group may explain some of this difference, but is unlikely to explain it all.