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close this bookAgricultural Expansion and Pioneer Settlements in the Humid Tropics (UNU, 1988, 305 pages)
close this folder4. The forest colonization process: case studies of two communities in north-east and south-east Thailand
View the document(introductory text...)
View the documentThe problem
Open this folder and view contentsCase study 1: history of settlement and in-migration
Open this folder and view contentsCase study 2: history of settlement
View the documentReferences

(introductory text...)

The problem

Case study 1: history of settlement and in-migration

Settlers and occupation groups
Settlement pattern and the community

Case study 2: history of settlement

Settlers and occupation groups
Settlement pattern and the community
Conclusion

References

Napat Sirisambhand

The information presented in this paper is from field surveys undertaken in February 1979 as part of a project on spontaneous land clearing in Thailand supported by the Volkswagen Foundation. The areas selected for the studies are in the north-east and south-east regions of Thailand (see fig. 1). The area in the north-east is called Ban Sarn Chao Po, or Km 79, and is in Tambon Wang Nam Khiew, Nakhon Ratchasima Province (Khorat). It lies on the west side of National Highway 304. Its hinterland contains at least five villages and about 14 hamlets. The area is located on the escarpment of the Khorat plateau and is characterized by small hills and undulating land-forms.

The second study area lies in King Amphoe Bo Thong, Chon Buri Province, 87 km to the south-east of Bangkok. The area includes eight villages and stretches eastward from King Amphoe township to the border of Rayong Province.

This paper attempts to describe the process of forest clearing and land use in Thailand by tracing the history and stages of settlement. Although the area of study may not be representative for the whole of Thailand, the two case studies have revealed some of the major causes and the sequence of deforestation, especially in the area where extensive cash-crop cultivation is predominant. The paper also focuses on the social aspect of the population involved in the process, its organization and adaptability to its new setting.