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close this bookInformation Technology in Selected Countries (UNU, 1994, 148 pages)
View the document(introductory text...)
View the documentNote to the Reader from the UNU
View the documentIntroduction
close this folder1: Development of information technology in Ireland
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View the document1. Introduction
View the document2. Historical perspective
View the document3. Government policy and the role of key institutions
View the document4. Development of the electronics industry
View the document5. Development of the software industry
View the document6. The telecommunications infrastructure for it
View the document7. Manufacturing applications of information technology
View the document8. IT applications in the service sector
View the document9. The impact of IT on employment
View the document10. Education and training in information technology
View the document11. Summary and implications for developing countries
View the documentAppendix A: IT-related courses in tertiary-level institutions in 1987/88
View the documentAppendix B: EOLAS innovation support programmes
View the documentReferences
close this folder2: Information technology in Ethiopia
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View the document1. Introduction
View the document2. Historical perspective
View the document3. Government policy and the role of key institutions
View the document4. Telecommunication infrastructure
View the document5. IT applications in the service sector
View the document6. Education and training in IT
View the documentAppendix: Computer courses
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close this folder3: Development of information technology in Nigeria
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View the document1. Introduction
View the document2. Growth of information technology
View the document3. IT policy
View the document4. The computer service industry
View the document5. Telecommunications
View the document6. Applications of IT
View the document7. Education and training in IT
View the document8. Conclusion
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close this folder4: Development of information technology in Tanzania
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View the document1. History of informatics in Tanzania
View the document2. Current situation: Computer hardware
View the document3. Trend in growth of hardware acquisition since the 1960s
View the document4. Current situation: Computer software
View the document5. Informatics education and training
View the document6. Computer usage
View the document7. Informatics infrastructure
View the document8. Informatics policy
View the documentReferences
View the documentOther titles of interest

4. Current situation: Computer software

Systems and Applications Software

There are no software houses in Tanzania. Most of the software in Tanzania is either imported or developed in-house. All systems software is imported. The discussion below therefore refers only to applications software. For convenience of discussion we can divide software into two groups:

(1) microcomputer software; and
(2) mini and mainframe software.

Microcomputer Software

Most of the applications that run on microcomputers use imported packages, such as Wordstar, WordPerfect, Lotus, Symphony, Dbase, and so on.

Most of the microcomputers are currently used for word processing and spreadsheets. They could be used in more advanced applications such as processing of accounting records. If this is to happen, the software to be used must either be developed internally or be customized to fit the local needs.

Mini and Mainframe Software

Most of the applications that run on minis and mainframes are developed internally. Some have been developed by foreign experts. The main feature in this area is that there are no integrated systems. Most systems are standalones. Plans totally to computerize the operations of the Tanzania Posts and Telecommunications Corporation started in early 1987, but so far there has been no success. The National Bank of Commerce wanted to computerize its operations. It bought an ICL ME 29, a machine that is clearly not configured for such a task. The efforts started back in 1987 and, again, there has been no progress; the machine was already obsolete at the time of purchase. These were two major projects in which foreign experts were involved.