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close this bookCompiling Data for Food Composition Data Bases (UNU, 1991, 68 pages)
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentExecutive summary
View the documentPreface
Open this folder and view contentsPart I the data base
Open this folder and view contentsPart II Gathering the data
View the documentReferences
View the documentOther Titles in this Series Food Composition Data

References

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