Cover Image
close this bookThe Global Greenhouse Regime: Who Pays? (UNU, 1993, 382 pages)
close this folderAppendix: The Climate change convention
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentBackground
View the documentClimate change convention
View the documentArticle 1. Definitions
View the documentArticle 2. Objective
View the documentArticle 3. Principles
View the documentArticle 4 Commitments
View the documentArticle 5. Research and systematic observation
View the documentArticle 6. Education, training and public awareness
View the documentArticle 7. Conference of the Parties
View the documentArticle 8. Secretariat
View the documentArticle 9. Subsidiary body for scientific and technological advice
View the documentArticle 10. Subsidiary Body for implementation
View the documentArticle 11. Financial mechanism
View the documentArticle 12. Communication of information related to implementation
View the documentArticle 13. Resolution of questions regarding implementation
View the documentArticle 14. Settlement of disputes
View the documentArticle 15. Amendments to the Convention
View the documentArticle 16. Adoption and amendment of annexes to the Convention
View the documentArticle 17. Protocols
View the documentArticle 18. Right to vote
View the documentArticle 19. Depositary
View the documentArticle 20. Signature
View the documentArticle 21. Interim arrangements
View the documentArticle 22. Ratification, acceptance, approval or accession
View the documentArticle 23. Entry into force
View the documentArticle 24. Reservations
View the documentArticle 25. Withdrawal
View the documentArticle 26. Authentic texts

Introduction

After negotiations which spanned 15 months, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change was finalized in May 1992. It was opened for signature at the UN Conference on Environment and Development - the Earth Summit - in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on 4 June 1992.

As of mid-October 1992,158 countries had signed the Convention, including the European Community. In order for the Convention to become law, it must be ratified by national legislatures of 50 countries, a process that may take two years.

The aim of this agreement is to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases at levels that will prevent human activities from interfering dangerously with the global climate system. In signing the Convention, Governments agree to reduce emissions of the warming greenhouse gases to "earlier" levels by the end of the decade. States are required to report periodically on their level of emissions and efforts to slow climate change. The target of reducing carbon dioxide emissions to 1990 levels by the end of the decade advocated by the European Community, Japan and most other countries but opposed by the United States - is stated as a goal to be met voluntarily.

To enable developing countries to meet their obligations under the Convention, developed countries agree to provide "new and additional" financial assistance. Such assistance is, for the time being, to be channelled through the Global Environment Facility, a fund administered jointly by the World Bank, the UN Development Programme and the UN Environment Programme (UNEP).