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close this bookThe Global Greenhouse Regime: Who Pays? (UNU, 1993, 382 pages)
close this folderAppendix: The Climate change convention
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentBackground
View the documentClimate change convention
View the documentArticle 1. Definitions
View the documentArticle 2. Objective
View the documentArticle 3. Principles
View the documentArticle 4 Commitments
View the documentArticle 5. Research and systematic observation
View the documentArticle 6. Education, training and public awareness
View the documentArticle 7. Conference of the Parties
View the documentArticle 8. Secretariat
View the documentArticle 9. Subsidiary body for scientific and technological advice
View the documentArticle 10. Subsidiary Body for implementation
View the documentArticle 11. Financial mechanism
View the documentArticle 12. Communication of information related to implementation
View the documentArticle 13. Resolution of questions regarding implementation
View the documentArticle 14. Settlement of disputes
View the documentArticle 15. Amendments to the Convention
View the documentArticle 16. Adoption and amendment of annexes to the Convention
View the documentArticle 17. Protocols
View the documentArticle 18. Right to vote
View the documentArticle 19. Depositary
View the documentArticle 20. Signature
View the documentArticle 21. Interim arrangements
View the documentArticle 22. Ratification, acceptance, approval or accession
View the documentArticle 23. Entry into force
View the documentArticle 24. Reservations
View the documentArticle 25. Withdrawal
View the documentArticle 26. Authentic texts

Background

The groundwork for the Framework Convention began in 1988 when the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution 43153 recognizing climate change as a common concern of humanity. That year, UNEP and the UN World Meteorological Organization (WMO) established the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to investigate the potential severity and impact of global climate change and to suggest possible policy responses. The IPCC's First Assessment Report was published in August 1990 and discussed at the second World Climate Conference later that year.

The report noted, among other things, that the 1989 session of the UN General Assembly had agreed that existing legal instruments and institutions dealing with climate change were insufficient and that a framework convention on climate change was needed. As a "framework", the Convention would outline a set of general principles and obligations in various areas. Subsequent negotiations would produce specific targets and quantitative reductions that would be added as protocols to the framework convention.

In December 1990, the General Assembly set up the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee for a Framework Convention on Climate Change (INC), to be supported by UNEP and WMO. Negotiations began in February 1991 and ran parallel to the work of the Committee preparing for the Earth Summit in the hope that a convention would be ready for signing by Governments in Brazil.