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close this bookThe North, the South and the Environment: Ecological Constraints and the Global Economy (UNU, 1995, 263 pages)
View the documentGlossary
View the documentThe contributors
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
View the documentChapter One: Introduction
View the documentChapter Two: Environmental Sustainability and the Growth of GDP: Conditions for Compatibility
View the documentChapter Three: Northern Growth and Environmental Constraints
View the documentChapter Four: Can the North Stop Consumption Growth? Escaping the Cycle of Work and Spend
View the documentChapter Five : Population Growth and the Environmental Crisis: Beyond the 'Obvious'
View the documentChapter Six: Distributive Justice and the Control of Global Warming
View the documentChapter Seven: Enclosing the Global Commons: Global Environmental Negotiations in a North-South Conflictual Approach
View the documentChapter Eight : Environmental Policies and North-South Trade: A Selected Survey of the Issues
View the documentChapter Nine: The Korean Model of Development and its Environmental Implications
View the documentChapter Ten: National Development and Local Environmental Action - The Case of the River Narmada
View the documentChapter Eleven: Economics and Ecosystems: The Case of Zimbabwean Peasant Households
View the documentChapter Twelve: Development After Ecology

Acknowledgements

This book was written as part of the World Institute for Development Economics Research's Macroeconomics Research Project. All involved would like to express their thanks to Stephen Marglin, director of the project, for his enormous contribution, organizational as well as intellectual. Several contributors to this volume have been associated with the project for a number of years and, thanks to his efforts, it has formed an ideal context for collaborative work.

Drafts of most of the chapters were discussed at a meeting at Corpus Christi College, Oxford in June 1993 and the value of these discussions was much enhanced by the work of Alvin Birdi as rapporteur.

Thanks are also due, for comments or other assistance with particular chapters, to Wendy Carlin and Bob Rowthorn (chapter 3), Jeff Chou, Heidi Ho and Tracy Terfertiller (chapter 4), Herman Cesar, Gerry Cohen and Bishnupriya Gupta (chapter 6), Mamta Mittal, Manoj Panda and Jyotsna Puri (chapter 8) and Jung Wk Kim (chapter 9).