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close this bookBioconversion of Organic Residues for Rural Communities (UNU, 1979)
close this folderMicro-organisms as tools for rural processing of organic residues
View the document(introductory text...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentMicrobial utilization of mono- and di-saccharide residues
View the documentMicrobial conversion of starchy residues
View the documentMicrobial conversion of complex mixtures of compounds (Polysaccharides, Proteins, Lipids, etc.)
View the documentMicrobial utilization of cellulose and ligno-cellulose residues
View the documentAlgal culture as a source of biomass
View the documentMicrobial utilization of silviculture biomass
View the documentMicro-organisms and marine and freshwater biomass
View the documentInternational studies on processing organic residues
View the documentReferences

Microbial conversion of complex mixtures of compounds (Polysaccharides, Proteins, Lipids, etc.)

The residues in this group (Table 1) consist of mixtures of various complex compounds resulting from several agro-industrial activities. Some of the compounds are soluble, others are colloidal or solid (1). In certain cases the residues may be fairly uniform in character (peels from potatoes or apples), whereas in other instances the material may be of varied composition (manure).

Under natural conditions, rarely are substances in this group transformed by a single microbial species. Rather, a mixed flora is usually responsible for the conversions that occur. Thus, it is generally impossible to single out separate species as being responsible for any transformations that take place. Some of the residues are such, however, that they could be utilized for alcohol fermentation or SCP production by yeast, or they could serve as a substrate in rural areas for biogas production, and for algal culture. Because these processes are currently receiving considerable attention, and it is not easy to single out other unique processes where pure cultures can be employed, the reader is referred to reviews by Rolz (1) and DaSilva et a). (2), and the treatise on methane generation from human, animal, and agricultural wastes (19).