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close this bookPromoting Health Through Schools - Report of a WHO Expert Committee on Comprehensive School Health Education and Promotion (WHO, 1997, 104 p.)
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View the documentWHO Expert Committee on Comprehensive School Health Education and Promotion
Open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Trends in school health
Open this folder and view contents3. Strengthening school health programmes at the international, national, and local levels
Open this folder and view contents4. Research on school health programmes
Open this folder and view contents5. Recommendations
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentReferences
View the documentWorld Health Organization technical report series
View the documentSelected WHO publications of related interest
View the documentBack cover

References

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