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close this bookManual for Trainers of Small Scale Beekeeping Development Workers (Peace Corps, 1983, 392 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPreface
View the documentAcknowledgments
Open this folder and view contentsIntroduction
View the documentSession 1: Establishing observation hives - group resource assessment
Open this folder and view contentsSession 2: Introduction to family live-in
View the documentSession 3: Training site investigation
View the documentSession 4: Defining expectations
View the documentSession 5: Assembling protective clothing
View the documentSession 6: Constructing KTBH's and preparing the apiary site
Open this folder and view contentsSession 7: Bee colony cycle - introduction to Trainee facilitation
Open this folder and view contentsSession 8: adult learning and an introduction to method demonstrations - basic insect anatomy
Open this folder and view contentsSession 9: Communication and listening skills
View the documentSession 10: Establishing individual nucs
View the documentSession 11: Functional biology of the honey bee
Open this folder and view contentsSession 12: Introduction to assessment and selection
View the documentSession 13: Introduction to program evaluation
View the documentSession 14: Bee management techniques
Open this folder and view contentsSession 15: Basic nutrition
Open this folder and view contentsSession 16: Types of bees and the bee-human relationship
View the documentSESSION 17: Foraging
View the documentSession 18: Hive design criteria and swarm boxes
Open this folder and view contentsSession 19: Role of the volunteer in development
Open this folder and view contentsSession 20: The bee space and types of hives
Open this folder and view contentsSession 21: Obtaining bees
View the documentSession 22: Transferring colonies
View the documentSession 23: Family live-in analysis
Open this folder and view contentsSession 24: Queen rearing
Open this folder and view contentsSession 25: Health and hygiene
View the documentSession 26: Swarming, supersedure and absconding
View the documentSession 27: Culture shock
View the documentSession 28: Constructing a swarm board and swarms
View the documentSession 29: Visual aids-queen rearing preparation
View the documentHandout 29A: Selecting communication tools
View the documentHandout 29B: Visual aids
Open this folder and view contentsSession 30: Extractors and solar wax melters
Open this folder and view contentsSession 31: Women in development-the role of men and women
Open this folder and view contentsSession 32: Mid-program evaluation
View the documentSession 33: Melliferous plants
View the documentSession 34: Preparation for site visit-information gathering
Open this folder and view contentsSession 35: Site visit-follow-up and cloncusions
View the documentSession 36: Honey
View the documentSession 37: Other hive products
View the documentSession 38: Anaphylactic shock
Open this folder and view contentsSession 39: Introduction to the bee fair
View the documentSession 40: Beeswax field trip
View the documentSession 41: Bees and trees
View the documentSession 42: Project planning and development
View the documentSession 43: Creamed honey and beeswax products
View the documentSession 44: Introduction to final assessment
View the documentSession 45: Cost analysis and project evaluation
View the documentSession 46: Bee diseases and pests
View the documentSession 47: Insecticides and bees
Open this folder and view contentsSession 48: Cooking with honey
View the documentSession 49: Introducing innovation-expectations beyond training
View the documentSession 50: Future training needs
View the documentSession 51: Site restitution
View the documentSession 52: Final program evaluation
Open this folder and view contentsAppendices

Session 33: Melliferous plants

Trainer Note

· This is a Trainee-facilitated session. See Session 7, "Bee Colony Cycle", for guidelines.

TOTAL TIME

2 hours

OVERVIEW

Melliferous plants and bees are the key components of any beekeeping venture. It is important to understand the plant-bee interaction, as well as the basic biology of the plant. The effects of this relationship on the plant and the bee are examined and reviewed. This session provides the
Trainees with the background to explore the beekeeping potential of an area, to recognize major bee-plant groups and determine the various major plant sources of honey.

OBJECTIVES

· To examine basic floral anatomy.

· To discuss pollination and cross-pollination.

· To examine the role of the bee in plant pollination.

· To examine the characteristics of a "good" honey plant.

RESOURCES

- Insect Pollination of Cultivated Crop Plants, pp. 1-18, 23-45.
- Source Materials for Apiculture #3.
- A Book of Honey, pp. 7-38.
- Tropical Legumes: Resources for the Future
- Beekeeping in the United States, pp. 73-77, 107-118.
- Firewood Crops: Shrubs and Tree Species for Energy Production
- The Hive and the Honey Bee, Chapters 8, 9 and 20.
- Forestry Training Manual, Session 32.
- Exotic Plants for House and Garden
- The Dancing Bees, Chapters 3, 8 and 9.

MATERIALS

hand lens, unlabeled schematic drawing of a flower, different examples of "bee attractive" plants (or pictures or slides), unlabeled schematic drawing

PROCEDURES

Step 1: Floral Anatomy (30 minutes)

Pass out a flower to each Trainee. Have each Trainee examine their flower and identify the various anatomical structures. Explain and discuss the structures. Post the schematic drawing and have the group label the various floral structures.

Touch on the fact that the Leguminosae and Compositae plant families contain major beeplants in most parts of the world. Discuss, through the use of examples or pictures, the important characteristics which distinguish these families.

Trainer Note

· Resources for the schematic drawing are The Hive and the Honey Bee, p. 585; A Book of Honey, p. 20; Insect Pollination of Cultivated Crop Plants, p. 9; Beekeeping in the United States, p. 108-114.

· Do not allow this step to become too academic. Allow the interests and needs of the group to determine the amount of detail necessary.

Step 2: Field Excursion (1 hour, 15 minutes)

Direct a "nature walk". Encourage the Trainees to observe, examine and share their questions and observations with the group. While on the walk have the Trainees:

- collect, dissect and identify floral structures, using a hand lens
- define plant pollination and cross pollination
- examine the role of the bee in the pollinating process
- identify bees collecting nectar and pollen
- discuss factors which make flowers attractive to bees
- outline the multi-purpose use of plants and
- find and identify Composites and Legumes.

Encourage interested Trainees to collect, examine and identify plants used by bees throughout the training program and to share their observations with the group.

Step 3: Session Evaluation (15 minutes)

Trainer Note

· See Steps 5 and 6 of Session 7, "Bee Colony Cycle".