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close this bookTeaching English as a Foreign Language - to Large, Multilevel Classes (Peace Corps, 1992, 243 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentIntroduction
close this folderTaking stock
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View the document“What am I doing here?
View the documentTaking stock of your peace corps resources
View the documentTaking stock of your colleagues
View the documentTaking stock of the system
View the documentFinal notes
View the documentQuestions to ask yourself
close this folderClassroom management
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View the document''How to avoid becoming a traffic cop?''
View the documentWorking with students
View the documentImproving discipline
View the documentCreating routines
View the documentQuestions to ask yourself
close this folderGetting to know your students
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View the document''Recognizing opportunities
View the documentConcerns outside the classroom
View the documentCultural values and expectations
View the documentEnglish language skills
View the documentRecommended class activities
View the documentA student questionnaire
View the documentPair interviews
View the documentSmall group discussions
View the documentWhole class activities
View the documentA writing sample
View the documentPersonal interview
View the documentRecord keeping
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close this folderApproaches to large classes
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View the document''Peace corps training is short and sweet.
View the documentCommunication and the communicative approach
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close this folderLearning styles and lessons plans
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View the documentTeaching students to celebrate diversity
View the documentLearning style theory
View the documentLearning style preferences
View the documentLesson planning
View the documentSample lesson plans
View the documentInformation
View the documentPractice
View the documentApplication
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close this folderLog-range planning
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentCreating a plan of action
View the document1. Who are my students?
View the documentII. What am I teaching?
View the documentIII. how am I teaching?
View the documentIV have I reached my coals?
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close this folderThe whole class
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View the documentAdapting to a traditional system
View the documentA potpourri of ideas
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close this folderPair work
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View the documentLearning to value cooperation
View the documentBenefits of cooperative learning
View the documentBeginning with pair work
View the documentLooking at the options
View the documentExploring issues through pair work
View the documentPair work to introduce social and study skills
View the documentOther options
View the documentPair work: cautions and limits
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close this folderGroup work
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View the documentPromoting a community spirit
View the documentGetting started with cooperative learning groups
View the documentPlanning group activities
View the documentCooperative learning activities
View the documentGroup assessment and evaluation
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close this folderIndependent study
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View the documentPreparing for a lifetime of learning
View the documentTeacher concerns
View the documentMaterials and activities
View the documentGrammar practice activities
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close this folderAssessing language skills
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentUsing tests to reinforce learning
View the documentInformational assessment
View the documentAssessing written language skills: reading/writing
View the documentSelf-assessment
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close this folderResources
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View the documentPeace corps language learning resources
View the documentPeace corps academic and community- based resources
View the documentAdditional recommendations
View the documentInformation collection & exchange

Pair interviews

The student questionnaire provides the basic text for the next assessment activity. Tell the students chat they need to interview each other. The whole class can work together to create questions from the questionnaire. Write these questions on the board and encourage the students co revise or make any corrections, as needed.

Add to the list by asking the students to think of questions about their study habits. "Do you get everything done on time, or leave everything until the last minute?" Prioritize the questions together, and eliminate those chat seem less important to the class. Your list of questions may be similar to the following model:


Interview

Tell the students that they are going co interview each other. Ask them co pair up with someone sitting nearby, preferably someone they don't know very well. Don't force any students to work together. If you have an odd number of students in your class, put three together and have them interview each other.

As soon as the students have finished the interviews, explain chat you want them to introduce each other to the class. Set a time frame. "You have two minutes to introduce your partner." Have them write key words on a piece of paper. A model on the board might include the following:

After the students have had a few moments to get organized, ask for some volunteers to come forward. If you are dealing with beginning level students, allow one student to ask questions while the partner answers. More advanced students can give brief descriptions that summarize their interviews. Whether they are trying to introduce each other to the class or listening to those presentations, all of the students are strengthening their language skills during this process.

With 30 to 75 pairs of students, not everyone will have an opportunity to give a presentation. However, if the students seem to enjoy speaking English in front of their classmates, allow them to sign up on your class calendar to be "guest speakers." Schedule no more than two pairs of students for each class period and limit their speaking time. The presentations are more enjoyable and interesting if students are not required to sit through too many introductions in one day.