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close this bookAgricultural Development and Vector-Borne Diseases (FAO - HABITAT - UNEP - WHO, 1996, 91 p.)
View the documentCopyrights
View the documentPreface - About PEEM - Acknowledgements
close this folderIntroduction
View the document1. Target audience, objectives, scope and structure
View the document2. How to use this slide set
View the document3. Introduction to the subject matter
View the document4. Brief description of major vector-borne diseases
View the documentGlossary
close this folderTopic A: Vector-borne diseases of relevance to agriculture
View the documentList of slides
View the documentI. About PEEM (Panel of Experts on Environmental Management for Vector Control)
View the documentA.1 Table of diseases
View the documentA.2 Global status of major vector-borne diseases
View the documentA.3 Global distribution of schistosomiasis: S. mansoni and S. intercalatum in Africa and the Americas
View the documentA.4 Global distribution of schistosomiasis: S. haematobium, S. japonicum and S. mekongi in Africa and Asia
View the documentA.5 Children infected with schistosomiasis
View the documentA.6 Global distribution of malaria
View the documentA.7 Number of malaria cases reported by WHO Region
View the documentA.8 Girl suffering from malaria, the Gambia
View the documentA.9 Distribution of yellow fever in Africa
View the documentA.10 Distribution of yellow fever in the Americas
View the documentA.11 Distribution of lymphatic filariasis in Africa and the Americas (WHO map 92353)
View the documentA.12 Distribution of lymphatic filariasis in Asia (WHO map 92354)
View the documentA.13 Distribution of onchocerciasis in Africa, with an indication of the area covered by OCP (WHO map 94910)
View the documentA.14 Distribution of onchocerciasis in the Americas (WHO map 94911)
View the documentA.15 A victim of river blindness (onchocerciasis)
View the documentA.16 Aerial view of an abandoned village in an area affected by onchocerciasis in West Africa
View the documentA.17 Distribution of Old World and New World visceral leishmaniasis (WHO map 89963)
View the documentA.18 Distribution of cutaneous and muco-cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World (WHO map 891104)
View the documentA.19 Distribution of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to L. tropica and L. aethiopica in the Old World (WHO map 89962)
View the documentA.20 Distribution of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to L. major in the Old World (WHO map 891105)
View the documentA.21 A case of cutaneous leishmaniasis
View the documentA.22 A case of cutaneous leishmaniasis
View the documentA.23 Oriental sore (cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Eastern Mediterranean)
View the documentA.24 Distribution of Japanese encephalitis cases by endemic country over the period 1986-1990
View the documentA.25 Distribution of sleeping sickness foci in West and Central Africa
View the documentA.26 Distribution of sleeping sickness vectors Glossina morsitans and G. pallidipes in East and southern Africa
View the documentA.27 Distribution of sleeping sickness vectors G. palpalis, G. fuscipes and G. tachinoides in West Africa
View the documentA.28 An example of sleeping sickness vector ecology in southern Africa
close this folderTopic B: Relevant disease vectors
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View the documentB.1 Principal genera of aquatic snails and the form of schistosomiasis they transmit
View the documentB.2 Shells of various snail intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis
View the documentB.3 The life cycle of schistosome parasites
View the documentB.4 Mosquitoes and the diseases they transmit
View the documentB.5 Mosquito life cycle
View the documentB.6 Anopheles gambiae, feeding
View the documentB.7 Sandfly, feeding
View the documentB.8 Blackfly, feeding
View the documentB.9 Blackfly larvae
View the documentB.10 Tsetse fly
View the documentB.11 Tsetse fly with its riverine ecology in West Africa
close this folderTopic C: Vector habitats
View the documentList of slides
View the documentC.1 Principal vector-borne diseases in relation to principal vector habitats.
View the documentC.2 The association between vectors, diseases and water
View the documentC.3 Main animal reservoirs of vector-borne diseases in humans
View the documentC.4 Snail habitats
View the documentC.5 The environment of freshwater snails
View the documentC.6 Food of freshwater, pulmonate snails
View the documentC.7 Snail habitats: a shallow well in the Gizan area of Saudi Arabia
View the documentC.8 Snail habitats: a concrete irrigation basin, Gizan area of Saudi Arabia
View the documentC.9 Snail habitats: drainage canal, Nakambala Sugar Estate, Zambia
View the documentC.10 Snail habitats: a burrow pit in the Kisumu area of western Kenya
View the documentC.11 Malaria vector species and their ecological requirements; a transsect of the Malaysian peninsula
View the documentC.12 Malaria vector habitats: coastal lagoons with brackish water (Anopheles sundaicus) in Malaysia
View the documentC.13 Malaria vector habitats: Anopheles balabacensis breeding places in temporary forest pools in Indonesia
View the documentC.14 Malaria vector habitats: Anopheles maculatus breeding places in rice growing areas in Nepal
View the documentC.15 Malaria vector habitats: irrigated rice fields, Office du Niger, in Mali, where a succession of species breeds
View the documentC.16 Malaria vector habitats: Anopheles gambiae breeding in exposed pools
View the documentC.17 Malaria vector habitats: Anopheles gambiae breeding rooftop tanks, Mauritius
View the documentC.18 Malaria vector habitats: Anopheles arabiensis breeding sites in desert areas
View the documentC.19 Natural habitat suited to the breeding of simuliid black flies
View the documentC.20 Landscape typifying sandfly habitat in South-West France
View the documentC.21 Landscape typifying sandfly habitat in central Kenya
View the documentC.22 Landscape typifying sandfly habitat in the arid, northern Kenya (termite mound)
View the documentC.23 Rodent burrow system as a sandfly habitat in Uzbekistan (Rhombomys colony)
View the documentC.24 Sandfly vector habitat in the domestic environment, Colombia
close this folderTopic D: Disease transmission, with special reference to schistosomiasis
View the documentList of slides
View the documentD.1 Diagram: How development can affect health
View the documentD.2 Diagram: Pathways of disease transmission in water resources development projects
View the documentD.3 Table: Contact frequency related to disease transmission
View the documentD.4 Small holder irrigation in Mali, creating an increased risk for schistosomiasis transmission
View the documentD.5 Dense snail population in reservoir, Mali
View the documentD.6 Irrigated rice production, increased transmission risk because of water contact patterns, Mali
View the documentD.7 Transmission risk of schistosomiasis related to inland fisheries in Mali
View the documentD.8 Ford across stream, Puerto Rico, creating a potential transmission focus for schistosomiasis
View the documentD.9 Irrigation turn out (and bath), Yemen, a potential transmission focus for schistosomiasis
View the documentD.10 Collecting water from a canal, Sudan
close this folderTopic E: Land use, vegetation and crops
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View the documentE.1 View of a varied catchment topography and vegetation in the Philippines
View the documentE.2 Forest clearing in Thailand
View the documentE.3 Forest clearing and shifting cultivation in Thailand
View the documentE.4 Rice cultivation following deforestation
View the documentE.5 Shifting cultivation and upland rice in India
View the documentE.6 Shifting cultivation and upland rice in Thailand
View the documentE.7 Forest workers in South East Asia
View the documentE.8 Camp of collectors of Brazil nuts in the Amazon region
View the documentE.9 Cutting firewood near Penang, Malaysia
View the documentE.10 Collecting and transporting wood for the market, Ethiopia
View the documentE.11 Resin tapping in a pine forest, Viet Nam
View the documentE.12 Rubber plantation inter-cropped with pineapple, Thailand
View the documentE.13 Gum tapping in Indonesia
View the documentE.14 Coffee picking in Colombia
View the documentE.15 Coffee plantation shaded by figtrees, Ethiopia
View the documentE.16 Fodder collection in India
View the documentE.17 Coconuts and cattle in Western Samoa
View the documentE.18 Introducing forestry in areas in India with problems of waterlogging and salinity
View the documentE.19 Pioneer planting in a Brazilian forest with a risk of leishmaniasis transmission
View the documentE.20 A papaya plantation in Mauritania
View the documentE.21 Cassava production in Mozambique
View the documentE.22 Cassava production in Indonesia
View the documentE.23 Sugar cane field adjacent to rice paddy in Tamil Nadu, South India
View the documentE.24 Close up of sugar cane crop, Tamil Nadu, South India
View the documentE.25 Terraced rice fields in Nepal
View the documentE.26 Lowland irrigated rice in southern Asia
View the documentE.27 Rice field, bush and dwelling, Bali, Indonesia
close this folderTopic F: Water use in agriculture
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View the documentF.1 Eighty percent of freshwater use is for agriculture
View the documentF.2 Water lifting for irrigation by human power, West Africa
View the documentF.3 Water lifting for irrigation by human power, India
View the documentF.4 Water lifting for irrigation by human power, China
View the documentF.5 Water lifting for irrigation by human power, China
View the documentF.6 Water lifting for irrigation by animal power, Egypt
View the documentF.7 Water lifting for irrigation by tractor, Tunisia
View the documentF.8 Lined canal and canaletti, Morocco
View the documentF.9 Hood irrigation, Egypt
View the documentF.10 Furrow irrigation with siphons, Tunisia
View the documentF.11 Sprinkler irrigation, India
View the documentF.12 Central pivot irrigation, Zambia
View the documentF.13 Trickle or drip irrigation, bananas, Egypt
View the documentF.14 Trickle or drip irrigation, tomatoes, Egypt
View the documentF.15 Irrigation canal and turn-outs, Pakistan
View the documentF.16 Effects of lack of infrastructure and poor irrigation management, Pakistan
View the documentF.17 Effects of lack of infrastructure and poor irrigation management, Pakistan
View the documentF.18 Waterlogged fields with crops
View the documentF.19 Waterlogged soybeans in the USA
View the documentF.20 Minor canal with aquatic weeds, Rahad, Sudan
View the documentF.21 An irrigation scheme in an arid area, Chad
View the documentF.22 Tank with dense Salvinia growth, Sri Lanka
View the documentF.23 Water storage for drinking water and livestock
View the documentF.24 Shallow well, Mozambique
View the documentF.25 Improved well, Keita, Niger
View the documentF.26 Village hand pump, Nepal
View the documentF.27 Aquaculture, India
View the documentF.28 Aquaculture in rice fields
View the documentF.29 Trimming and cleaning of a fishpond
close this folderTopic G: Cultivation practices
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View the documentG.1 Riceland preparation with oxen, Africa
View the documentG.2 Riceland preparation with water buffaloes, Philippines
View the documentG.3 Deep ploughing by tractor, Malaysia
View the documentG.4 Aerial infrared photograph of a riceland system, Texas, USA
View the documentG.5 Rice harvesting equipment, Texas, USA
View the documentG.6 Equipment tire racks in rice field, Texas, USA
View the documentG.7 Aerial photograph of riceland study site, Texas, USA
View the documentG.8 Colour infrared photograph of levees and tire tracks, Texas USA
View the documentG.9 Oviposition features in ricelands, Texas, USA
close this folderTopic H: Influence of livestock
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View the documentH.1 Water buffaloes in rice fields, Tamil Nadu, India
View the documentH.2 Household suffering from visceral leishmaniasis. North India
View the documentH.3 Use of rice fields as pasture land between cropping cycles, USA
View the documentH.4 Hoof prints in pasture lands providing breeding sites for floodwater mosquitoes, USA
View the documentH.5 Egrets in an irrigated rice field
close this folderTopic J: Plant protection, pest control and chemical inputs
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View the documentJ.1 Spraying rice for pest control, Lao People’s Republic
View the documentJ.2 Spraying rice for pest control, Lao People’s Republic
View the documentJ.3 Spraying rice for pest control, People’s Republic of China
View the documentJ.4 Spraying rice for pest control, People’s Republic of China
View the documentJ.5 Pest control and fertilizer spraying
View the documentJ.6 Broadcasting fertilizer in paddy fields, Tamil Nadu, India
View the documentJ.7 Traps for tsetse fly (human sleeping sickness, cattle nagana) control, Burkina Faso
View the documentJ.8 Chemical control of tsetse flies, Burkina Faso
View the documentJ.9 Chemical control of tsetse flies, Burkina Faso
View the documentJ.10 Azolla use in rice fields, as joint weed control/fertilizer, Tamil Nadu, India
View the documentJ.11 Azolla use in rice fields, as joint weed control/fertilizer, Tamil Nadu, India
View the documentJ.12 Close up of Azolla
View the documentJ.13 Laboratory studies: effect of Azolla coverage on anopheline mosquitoes
View the documentJ.14 Laboratory studies: effect of Azolla coverage on culicine mosquitoes
View the documentJ.15 Dragonfly on sugar cane, Tamil Nadu, India
View the documentJ.16 Gambusia for rice field mosquito control, Afghanistan
View the documentJ.17 Focal application of Bayluscide® in an irrigation canal, Egypt
View the documentJ.18 Fish kill by Bayluscide®, Egypt
View the documentJ.19 Mechanical weed clearance of canals
View the documentJ.20 The Chinese grass carp
View the documentJ.21 Lined canal with fast water flow, Zimbabwe
View the documentJ.22 Drying out of canals
View the documentJ.23 Control of Rhombomys colonies in the former USSR (now Uzbekistan)
View the documentJ.24 Alternate wetting and drying in Chinese rice irrigation
View the documentJ.25 Vector larvae populations in conventionally irrigated rice fields versus those with alternate wetting and drying
View the documentJ.26 Effect of alternate wetting and drying on the rice yield
View the documentJ.27 The International Code of Conduct
close this folderTopic K: Rural settlements
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View the documentK.1 Overnight forest shelter, South East Asia
View the documentK.2 Forest workers camp, South East Asia
View the documentK.3 Forest family dwelling, Philippines
View the documentK.4 Lahu village, Thailand
View the documentK.5 Typical rice growing settlement, tropical lowlands of Bolivia
View the documentK.6 Typical rice growing settlement, tropical lowlands of Bolivia
View the documentK.7 Village scene, Myanmar
View the documentK.8 Village scene, Myanmar
View the documentK.9 Village ecology, rice growing area, Tamil Nadu, India
View the documentK.10 Village scene, Egypt
View the documentK.11 Displaced rural people in an urban slum, India
View the documentK.12 Integrated rural settlement development, Nepal
View the documentK.13 Use of impregnated mosquito nets in the Gambia
close this folderBibliography
View the documentPEEM publications
View the documentOther publications
View the documentSlide Set Series