Cover Image
close this bookFunctional Adult Literacy (FAL) - Training manual (German Adult Education Association - UNICEF, 1996, 106 p.)
close this folderUnit Six: Monitoring and Evaluating Functional Adult Literacy Programmes
View the document(introduction...)
View the document6.1 Information Collection, Use and Storage
View the document6.2 Introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation
View the document6.3 Monitoring FAL Programmes.
View the document6.4 Evaluating FAL Programmes

(introduction...)

Purpose:

This unit is to enable the functional adult literacy instructors and supervisors to acquire the necessary knowledge and skills so as to facilitate others to monitor and evaluate functional adult literacy programmes. The unit is also intended to equip the participants with the skills necessary for collecting using information in functional adult literacy programmes.

Topics covered in this Unit:

6.1 Information collection use and storage in FAL programmes.
6.2 Introduction to monitoring and evaluation.
6.3 Monitoring Functional Adult Literacy programmes.
6.4 Evaluating Functional Adult literacy programmes.

6.1 Information Collection, Use and Storage

a) Introduction:

Information plays a vital role in functional adult literacy programmes. Those involved in the programmes need to know the type of information to collect and the tools to use in collecting this information.

b) Objectives:

By the end of the session, the participants should be able to:

· Explain the meaning of “information”
· Identify the information relevant to functional adult literacy programmes.
· Describe the role of information in functional adult literacy programmes.

c) Time: 1 hour 30 minutes.

d) Learning Aids: Newsprint or cards, markers, masking tape or blackboard and chalk.

e) Procedure and Learning Points:

Step 1.

[15 min.] Brainstorming.

- Facilitator asks the question “What is information?”
- Participants write their responses on blackboard or newsprint or cards.
- Key ideas in their definition are identified.
- Facilitator’s input is presented and compared with participants’ responses.

Possible Responses:

- ideas

)

told,

- facts

)

or heard

- figures

)

or discovered

- data

)

about

- news

)

something

- theories

)

or somebody.

Step 2: Buzz session.

[25 min.] Participants in two’s or three’s are asked to discuss and identify information that is relevant to PAL programmes.

Participants present their work, which is then discussed by the bigger group.

Possible Responses:

- Population of illiterate and literate by age and sex.

- Literacy levels.

- Attendance.

- Enrolment

- beginners


- continuing.

- Completion date.

- Drop-out Drop-in Drop back.

- Retention rate.

- Number of on-going classes.

- Dates when classes started and ended.

- Venues and facilitators.

- Progress in class.

- Number of literacy instructors

- sex


- training.

- Instructional materials/equipment.

- Learners income-generating activities.

- Other community development activities.

- Important events in the community.

Facilitator’s remarks:

A lot of information can be collected about FAL programmes and in this case use can be made of the needs assessment exercise which was earlier on conducted. It is important that the learners participate in the process of information collection and use. Hence, they should be encouraged to develop their own tools for information collection like arranging information in an exercise book. There is also need to develop a common information tool for both the supervisor and the instructor.

Step 3: Group Work.

[40 min.] Participants form groups of 5 - 7 people and are assigned the following task:

Discuss the role of information in FAL programmes.
In plenary, participants’ work is presented and discussed.

Possible Responses:

· Information provides a base for establishing where the programme or community is “at”.
· It is useful in assessing needs, analysing causes and effects of illiteracy.
· It facilitates the planning of intervention strategies.
· It is important in identifying required resources both from within and outside.
· Information is required in the implementation of planned activities.
· It is very useful in assessing coverage and impact of FAL programmes.
· Information makes it possible to take informed decisions on FAL.
· Information, if stored, is important for future use and references purposes.

Facilitator’s remarks:

Information is very vital for the success of FAL programmes. It is important that the learners appreciate the vital roles of information so as to consequently plan to collect and use it.

f) Assessment.

[10 min.] Ask participants to point out what information they would consider if they were to start a FAL programme.

g) Follow-up:

Prepare an information tool that you could use to gather information on FAL.

6.2 Introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation

a) Introduction:

This unit is intended to enable the participants acquire the necessary knowledge and skills which they can use to facilitate other key actors monitor and evaluate the FAL programme.

b) Objectives:

By the end of the session, the participants should be able to:

· explain the meaning of monitoring and evaluation.
· state the reasons for monitoring and evaluation.

c) Time: 1 hour 10 minutes.

d) Learning Aids: newsprint, cards, markers, masking tape, or blackboard and chalk.

e) Procedure and Learning Points:

Step 1: Brainstorming session.

Facilitator asks participants to write down what they understand by the terms “Monitoring” and “Evaluation”.

[25 min.] Participants responses are presented and discussed. Facilitator introduces his/her input which is compared with participants’ responses. Key ideas are emphasized.

Possible Responses:

Monitoring:

a continuous follow-up of the progress of a piece of work.

Evaluation:

periodic assessment of the impact a project or programme under review has made in relation to its set objectives.

Step 2: Group work.

[45 min.] Participants form groups of 5-7 persons and facilitator assigns them the following tasks:

a) What are the reasons for which monitoring is done?
b) What are the reasons for which evaluation is done?

Participants’ responses are put on newsprint or cards or blackboard, followed by discussion.
Facilitator’s input is compared with participants’ presentations.

a) Possible reasons for Monitoring:

· to establish the trend (of performance).
· to determine how resources are being utilised.
· to collect information useful in implementation and decision-making.
· to check on the relevance of a programme/activity.
· to take corrective measures early enough.
· to share and gain experiences on the improvements.

b) Possible reasons for Evaluation:

· to determine the impact of a programme/activity.
· to determine the efficiency and effectiveness of programme/activity.
· to find out the extent to which the set objectives are being met.
· to assess the relevance of a programme/activity.
· to make use of the experiences gained.
· it allows innovation to take place.

Wrap-up:

Monitoring and evaluation are key activities in the life of any programme or activity. A continuous check on any activity to determine progress or lack of progress is necessary whereas periodically an assessment of performance in relation to objectives is important particularly for knowing impact.

f) Assessment:

Facilitator asks participants to point out the importance of monitoring and evaluation to their activities.

g) Follow-up:

Participants to work out the meaning of the two concepts, monitoring and evaluation, in their own local language(s).

6.3 Monitoring FAL Programmes.

a) Introduction:

This topic is intended to enable participants identify what to monitor, and the tools and skills to use during the monitoring of functional adult literacy programme.

b) Objectives:

By the end of the session, the participants should be able to:

· Identify what to monitor in functional adult literacy programme.
· Identify the tools to use for monitoring FAL programme.
· Describe the skills to be used in monitoring FAL.

c) Time: 1 hour 30 minutes.

d) Learning Aids: Newsprint, cards, markers, masking tape, or blackboard, chalk.

e) Procedure and Learning Points:

Step 1: Role play.

[15 min.] A District Officer is conducting a monitoring exercise in Butansi village. She moves around the homesteads, asking questions and ticks off from a sheet of paper.

Step 2: Questions about the role play:

a) What was happening in the role-play?
b) What could have gone wrong?
c) How could it have been performed better?

Step 3: Group Work.

[30 min.] In groups of 5-7 persons, the participants work on the following tasks:

a) What issues would you monitor in a FAL programme (indicators)?
b) What tools would you use to carry out such monitoring?
c) What skills would you need to carry out monitoring of a FAL programme?

Step 4: Plenary session.

[30 min.] Groups present their work which is discussed and compared with the facilitator’s input.

Possible responses:

a) What to monitor:

· output.
· attendance.
· drop-outs.
· enrolment.
· facilitation.
· level of participation, quality of discussions.
· who reads and how often.
· supply and use of materials.
· time taken per activity.
· resources.
· visits.
· content and quality of participants’ books.

b) Tools to use to monitor FAL programme:

· village profile.
· class registers.
· village record books.
· timetables.
· questionnaire.
· self-evaluation techniques (such as a woodmeter)
· records at health/educational/administrative units.

c) Skills to use during monitoring:

· Interviewing skills:

- ability to ask clear questions.
- ability to link questions.
- ability to concentrate.
- repeating what you have heard.

· Observation skills:

- can tell whether a participant is happy or not.
- can tell whether some members are dominating others.

· Listening skills:

- ability to concentrate.
- repeating what you have heard.

· Recording skills:

- ability to record the facts or main ideas.
- ability to operate recording equipment.

· Analysis skills:

- ability to bring out important issues, pointing out differences, advantages, disadvantages.

Wrap-up:

It is important that the various actors in FAL programme such as the co-ordinator, the trainers, the instructors, the supervisors and the learners are all involved in the monitoring exercise. This therefore, calls for the setting of issues to monitor (indicators) acceptable to each category of actors.

f) Assessment:

[10 min.] Of the issues to monitor, which ones do you think would be relevant for learners, and which ones for the instructor or supervisor?

g) Follow-up:

Work out your own tools that you will use for monitoring FAL programme.

6.4 Evaluating FAL Programmes

a) Introduction:

This topic attempts to answer questions of what is evaluation in a FAL programme and what tools and skills are used.

After going through these questions, the participant is expected to effectively evaluate a FAL programme.

b) Objectives:

By the end of the session, the participants should be able to:

· Identify the issues to evaluate in a FAL programme.
· Identify the tools to be used in evaluating a FAL programme.
· Describe the skills to be used in evaluating a FAL programme.

c) Time: 1 hour 45 minutes.

d) Learning Aids: Newsprint, cards, markers, masking tape, blackboard, chalk.

e) Procedure and Learning Points:

Step 1:

[20 min.] Facilitator puts up the following drawing for participants to view:


Figure

After viewing for a few minutes, participants are asked the following questions to establish whether they are all seeing the same things in the picture.

a) What do you see in the picture?
b) What is happening in the picture?

Possible Responses:

a) Two men, one is a farmer the other one is an extension worker.
b) The extension worker is on an exercise of gathering some information. The farmer is busy digging.

Step 2: Group work.

[40 min.] In groups of 5-7 persons, participants work on the following tasks:

Supposing you were the extension worker (literacy supervisor) like the one in the picture, evaluating a FAL programme.

a) What would you evaluate as learners and as trainers?
b) What tools would you use?
c) What skills would you need in this evaluation?

Step 3: Plenary.

[40 min.] Groups present their work for discussion. Facilitator then introduces his/her input for discussion/comparison.

Possible Responses:

a) What to evaluate (indicators):

As learners (community level)

· Number of participants.
· Behaviour and attendance of their teacher.
· Status of their blackboard and literacy shelter.
· Availability and status of other learning materials.
· Reading and common text in the community, e.g. books of their children.
· Ability to keep their business records properly.
· Being able to perform more effectively in their respective community and family roles using the literacy skills and knowledge acquired.

As facilitators (trainers)

· Name, age, sex, education, standard of each participant.

· Enrolment and number attending by name, sex (Degree of participation)

· Reasons for irregular attendance and drop-out.

· Learners’ expectations/benefits.

· Level of skills attainment (3Rs) and other development skills and knowledge, e.g. analytical skills.

· Retention levels.

· Effectiveness and efficiency of resources and methods used.

b) Skills to be used in evaluation:

· Analytical skills.
· Interviewing skills.
· Observation skills.
· Data collection skills.
· Listening skills.

Wrap-up:

As in monitoring, all the key players in the FAL programme need to be involved in the evaluation exercise. For that matter, each level of players ought to develop indicators or issues to evaluate. Evaluation exercise requires one to develop a number of skills such as observation, interviewing and analysis.

f) Assessment:

Which of the discussed tools and evaluation indicators would you omit and why?

g) Follow-up:

Prepare the tools that you will use for evaluating the FAL programme.