Cover Image
close this bookTechnical Guide for Tilapia Farming (CDI, 1998, 51 p.)
close this folderPART ONE: FISH FARMING NOTIONS
View the documentA. Tilapia
Open this folder and view contentsB. Notions of Tilapia rearing
Open this folder and view contentsC. Fish farming sites
Open this folder and view contentsD. Fish farming facilities
Open this folder and view contentsE. Technical characteristics of the facilities
Open this folder and view contentsF. Problems for aquaculture projects
Open this folder and view contentsG. Fish processing
Open this folder and view contentsH. Ideas about fish farming management
Open this folder and view contentsI. Some criteria used for economic projections
View the documentJ. Legislative and legal aspects
View the documentConclusions

J. Legislative and legal aspects

Before the implementation of a fish farm, it is absolutely necessary to obtain all of the permits concerned by the construction and operation of the activity. Operating permits, water regulation rights (input and output-drainage), construction permits etc.

This aspect is particularly important because, in many countries, several months (sometimes, even years) are necessary to obtain all of the permits required.

Some countries do not allow the import of 'exotic'8 species. Even in the case of tilapia, the problem must be considered because the local tilapia species are not necessarily adequate for fish farming while a non-native tilapia species may provide a better economic performer.

8 'Exotic species' usually refers to non-native species

A stronger and important recommendation is to envisage the achievement of an environmental impact study (EIA), a study which shows that the promoter is conscious of environmental matters and has taken this particular aspect into consideration. Obviously, demonstration that there is no negative impact on water resources or other local environmental matters is a desirable position.