Cover Image
close this bookIntensive Vegetable Gardening for Profit and Self-Sufficiency (Peace Corps, 1978, 158 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentIntroduction
close this folderChapter one: Botany
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close this folderPlant structure
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View the documentRoots
View the documentThe shoot system
View the documentLeaves
View the documentThe stem
View the documentThe flower
View the documentThe seed
close this folderChapter two: The soil and fertility
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View the documentThe fertility cycle of soil
close this folderA dictionary for soil study
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View the documentSoil
View the documentTexture
View the documentStructure
View the documentPorosity
View the documentWater
View the documentSoil pH
close this folderSoil testing
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View the documentThe soil test kit
View the documentCollecting the soil sample
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close this folderElements required for plant growth
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View the documentNitrogen
View the documentPhosphorous
View the documentPotassium
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View the documentSoil microbes and the soil workshop
close this folderChapter three: soil management and improvement
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View the documentOrganic matter in soil management
close this folderOrganic fertilizers
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View the documentAnimal manures
View the documentLiquid fertilizers
View the documentOrganic refuse as fertilizers and texturizers
View the documentSoil improving crops
close this folderChemical fertilizers
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View the documentThe use of chemical fertilizers
View the documentFertilizer application
close this folderComposting
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View the documentThe kitchen compost method
View the documentIndore composting method
View the document14 Day composting method
View the documentSoil management program
close this folderChapter four: Garden planning
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View the documentGarden location
View the documentThe garden plan
View the documentPlanning to plant
View the documentSuccession planting
View the documentCompanion planting
View the documentA garden notebook
close this folderThe garden account: production, costs, and income
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View the documentTomatoes on 1 acre
View the documentOne-tenth acre of onions
View the documentA bed of cabbage to help the food budget
View the documentProfits from one acre for a skillful farmer
close this folderChapter five: soil preparation for intensive gardening
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View the documentIntensive raised beds
close this folderHow to make a raised bed
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View the documentStep one: loosening and cleaning the soil
View the documentDouble-digging the soil
View the documentStep three: rest and fertilization
View the documentStep four: forming the ''lip'' of the bed
View the documentBed preparation time requirements
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close this folderMechanization and land preparation for the small farmer
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View the documentPower hand tractors
View the documentThe use of power hand tractors in raised bed preparation
View the documentUse of hand tractors in row crop production
close this folderOther types of land preparation
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View the documentRaised ridges
View the documentFurrows
View the documentLevel planting
close this folderMulching
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View the documentAdvantages of mulching
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close this folderChapter six: Water
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View the documentWater catchment
View the documentShade, soil texture and water conservation
View the documentTrickle irrigation
View the documentPitcher irrigation
View the documentBamboo irrigation systems
View the documentIrrigation and watering of intensive gardens in raised beds
View the documentWater preferences of plants
View the documentAdequate watering
close this folderChapter seven: Planting
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close this folderSowing seeds
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View the documentBroadcasting
View the documentIntensive spacing of seeds
View the documentDiagonal offset planting
View the documentClose row planting
close this folderGrowing transplants
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View the documentWhere to grow transplants
View the documentSoil for growing transplants
View the documentSpacing and thinning
View the documentCare and watering
View the documentTransplanting and reducing plant shock
View the documentCompanion planting
View the documentSuccession planting
View the documentCrop rotation
View the documentCrop types and families
View the documentConclusions on planting
close this folderChapter eight: cultivation for highly productive gardens
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View the documentCultivation
close this folderGarden tools
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View the documentUseful and necessary tools for the market-gardener
View the documentSprayers
View the documentPower hand tractors
View the documentShredder-grinder
close this folderPest management
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View the documentNatural controls of insects and diseases
View the documentSpraying
View the documentSummary
View the documentA final word
View the documentTables for guidance
View the documentBibliography

Acknowledgements

We extend our sincerest gratitude to all the people in Jamaica who have given us the experiences and understanding to write this manual.

Special thanks goes to Dr. Merlyn Kettering whose help and inspirations made this manual possible. Special thanks also to Mr. Don Drga, Agriculture Advisor for U.S. Peace Corps, for his encouragement and support.

The support of the Jamaican Ministry of Agriculture has been most appreciated, especially that of Mr. Fred Zenny, Mr. Derrick Stone, and Mr. Ram Dat. We are grateful for the help and advice received from Mr. Willie Carr, Farm Manager, and Mr. Thompson, Agriculture Extension Officer, both of Falmouth Land Authority. For some of our deepest insights into Jamaican agriculture we are indebted to Mr Hylton Sutherland, Mr. Orrett Rochester and family, and Mr. Anthony Adams, all of St. Elizabeth.

We would also like to thank all the Extension Officers and Headmen who have given us assistance in various areas of Jamaica, and all the people on the Irwin Tower Land Lease property for sharing with us their knowledge and understanding of the land.

We shall always remember the warm times shared amongst the people, and especially the youth, who are concerned with the future of agriculture in Jamaica. To these persons we dedicate this book.

Deborah and James Vickery Peace Corps Volunteers August, 1977