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close this bookStormwater Drainage and Land Reclamation for Urban Development (HABITAT, 1991, 94 p.)
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View the documentFOREWORD
Open this folder and view contentsINTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contentsI. URBANIZATION AND THE DEMAND FOR URBAN LAND
Open this folder and view contentsII. POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF STORMWATER DRAINAGE AND LAND RECLAMATION PROJECTS
Open this folder and view contentsIII. TECHNICAL OPTIONS FOR STORMWATER DRAINAGE AND LAND RECLAMATION
Open this folder and view contentsIV. MAINTENANCE
Open this folder and view contentsV. PROJECT APPRAISAL
View the documentVI. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
View the documentBIBLIOGRAPHY
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex I: STORMWATER DRAINAGE DESIGN PROCEDURES
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VI. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

A. Conclusions

1. Urban stormwater management is an essential component of urban development programmes and, in particular, of urban health programmes. It can provide reclaimed, safe urban land for human settlements, industry and commerce. If the reclaimed land is used for human settlements, then these will be much healthier environments than undrained settlements, and significant reductions in vector-borne diseases, diarrhoeal diseases and geohelminthic infections will occur.

2. Effective stormwater management can protect not only low-lying areas from inundation, but also human settlements on steep hillsides where the threat of storm-induced landslips can be minimized or even obviated.

3. Stormwater management projects require careful appraisal, design, implementation, and operation and maintenance. All these project stages are vital to project success.

4. Properly implemented and maintained stormwater management projects may be expected to increase land values significantly. Such projects are almost inevitably highly cost-effective, but improperly developed schemes are likely to be economically, and possibly also ecologically, expensive, if not disastrous.

B. Recommendations

1. Governments in developing countries, both national and local, should become more aware of the potential socio-economic benefits - principally improved health and increased land values - of urban stormwater management programmes and projects.

2. Governments need to decide, in any one instance and always on the basis of socio-economic equity, how best to allocate urban land reclaimed by stormwater drainage to the competing sectors of housing, industry and commerce.

3. Local governments, which are normally responsible for the execution and operation of stormwater drainage projects, must not only ensure their proper design and implementation, but also make sound provision for their long-term successful operation, for which a programme of regular preventative maintenance is essential.