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REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188
Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188), Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY(Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED August 1992 Technical Paper
4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE
Survey and Analysis of Research on Supersonic Drag-Due-to-Lift Minimization With Recommendations for Wing Design

6. AUTHOR(S)
Harry W. Carlson and Michael J. Mann

7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) NASA Langley Research Center
Hampton, VA 23681-0001

9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) National Aeronautics and Space Administration Washington, DC 20546-0001

5. FUNDING NUMBERS

WU 505-68-70-02

8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION
REPORT NUMBER

L-16963

10. SPONSORING/MONITORING
AGENCY REPORT NUMBER
NASA TP-3202

11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES
Carlson: Lockheed Engineering & Sciences Co., Hampton, VA; Mann: Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA.

12a. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE

Unclassified{Unlimited

Subject Category 02

13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words)
A survey of research on drag-due-to-lift minimization at supersonic speeds, including a study of the effectiveness of current design and analysis methods, has been conducted. The results show that a linearized theory analysis with estimated attainable thrust and vortex force effects can predict with reasonable accuracy the lifting efficiency of flat wings. Significantly better wing performance can be achieved through the use of twist and camber. Although linearized theory methods tend to overestimate the amount of twist and camber required for a given application and provide an overly optimistic performance prediction, these deficiencies can be overcome by implementation of recently developed empirical corrections. Numerous examples of the correlation of experiment and theory are presented to demonstrate the applicability and limitations of linearized theory methods with and without empirical corrections. The use of an Euler code for the estimation of aerodynamic characteristics of a twisted and cambered wing and its application to design by iteration are discussed.

14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Supersonic drag due to lift; Supersonic wing design 156 16. PRICE CODE
A08
17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. LIMITATION OF REPORT OF THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT OF ABSTRACT Unclassified Unclassified
NSN 7540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298(Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18
298-102 NASA-Langley, 1992