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close this bookContextualising Teaching and Learning in Rural Primary Schools: Using Agricultural Experience - Volume 2 - Education Research Paper No. 20 (DFID, 1997, 130 p.)
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View the documentDepartment for International Development - Education Papers
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View the document1 Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2 Methodology
Open this folder and view contents3 Country case studies
Open this folder and view contents4 References for the country studies

Acknowledgements

In Volume II of this research report, the editors wish to thank the Education Division of the Department for International Development for funding this research, particularly Malcolm Seath, Terry Allsop and Graham Larkbey for all their assistance and advice. The proof-reading skills and patience of Christina H. Ntchougan-Sonou of St. Peter's College, Oxford, are gratefully acknowledged, as are her many helpful comments and suggestions.

Tanzania

Thanks are given to the many teachers, pupils, parents, policy makers, researchers, educationalists and community members in Tanzania who were willing to give time, information and their views in the course of this research. The Government of Tanzania gave permission for this research to proceed, and thanks go to officials of the Tanzanian Ministry of Education for their assistance in this regard. The contributions of the District Education Officer and District Academic Officer of Arumeru District are acknowledged, as is the cooperation of the headteachers of the four schools visited during the research.

Sri Lanka

Many thanks are given to Dr. G Nanayakkara, Director, Department of Primary Education, NIE, for allowing Padmini Ranaweera to collaborate with us in this work. Mr. S. B. Thoradeniya, Director Primary Education, Ministry of Education, Mr. LS. Kuruppu, Consultant on Primary Education, Mr S.M.S.M. Wijerathne, Project Officer, Department of Primary Education, NIE, and Dr. Nanayakkara, are acknowledged for their valuable comments and advice during the case study work. Thanks are also given to all the officers within the Primary Education Department at NIE who attended a meeting to discuss the case study findings. A number of discussions were held with Ms. Amara Amarasingh, ECD Project Officer, UNICEF Colombo and her comments and advice were greatly appreciated. Thanks are given to the teachers, pupils and parents of the two main case study schools. Without their co-operation, patience and time this study would not have been possible. We cannot thank everyone enough for the interest they showed in this study and their willingness to answer our endless questions. One-day visits were made to two other schools and the co-operation and time given by teachers and pupils was greatly appreciated.

India

Mr Sidda Gangaiah, Lecturer, DIET, Mysore, is greatly acknowledged for his continued help and support before, during and after this study. Thanks are also given to Mr Eshwar Bhat, Director, DIET, Mysore for his help and support throughout the study. Sincere thanks are given to the teachers, pupils and parents of the two main case study schools. Without their co-operation, patience and time this study would not have been possible. In particular we would like to thank one of these schools who, on our last visit, held a short ceremony in our honour which was a very touching event. The Assistant Block Education Officer and School Inspectors from the district of the two case study schools provided us with some useful background information. One-day visits were made to two other schools and thanks are given to the teachers, pupils and parents from these schools for their time and patience. In particular we would like to thank the parents and teachers of one school who provided us with a delicious lunch. The following people attended a meeting to discuss the project and the present situation of education in India. Their comments and ideas were greatly appreciated as was there time to attend what proved to be a lively and critical discussion: Dr. M.S. Murarirao, Professor of Technology (retired), Regional Institute of Education, Mysore; Professor C.G. Venkataramana Setty, Retired Principal, Government Teachers College, Mysore; N. Venkataiah, Dean, Faculty of Education, University of Mysore; A.S.N. Raosindhe, Reader in Education, Regional Institute of Education, Mysore; Ms. Lalithamma, Head, Department of Studies in Education, University of Mysore; Dr. N.M. Rao, Reader in Mathematics, RIE, Mysore; Ram Kulkarmi, Joint Director of Public Instruction (retired); Mr. V.D. Bhat, Reader in Education, RIE, Mysore.

Ethiopia

Officials in the Ministry of Education, and Ministry of Economic Development and Co-operation kindly gave their permission for this research work to take place in Ethiopia. The British Embassy were helpful in providing initial contacts to enable the field work to be carried out. Thanks are given to the teachers, pupils and parents of the two main case study schools. Without their cooperation, patience and time this study would not have been possible. Thanks are also given to Officers at the Woreda Administration Office and Woreda Agricultural Extension Office who provided background information of the village in which School A is situated; Oromia Regional, Zonal and Woreda Education Offices for allowined the field work to be carried out in their schools. The following people are acknowledged for their valuable comments and suggestions at the beginning and end of the work in Ethiopia: Dr. Wilhelm Schuldt, PEAP, GTZ; Andrew Bringham, British Council; Berhanu Habtermeriam, ICDR; Kedir Ibrahim, ICDR; and Officials in Oromia Education Bureau.