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close this bookAppropriate Community Technology - A Training Manual (Peace Corps, 1982, 685 p.)
close this folderPhase II: Earthen construction and fuel-saving cookstoves
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPhase II Calendar
View the documentSession 1. Environmental health and sanitation
View the documentSession 2. Traditional methods of cooking: an introduction to cookstove technologies
View the documentSession 3. Fuel-saying cookstoves: gathering information
View the documentSession 4. Cookstove design and innovations
View the documentSession 5. Thinking in pictures: introduction to design drawing
View the documentSession 6. Introduction to independent study
View the documentSession 7. Cookstove operation function and design principles
View the documentSession 8. Understanding the cookstove design process and soil mixes
View the documentSession 9. Insolation meter construction
View the documentSession 10. Cookstove construction
View the documentSession 11. Nature of volunteerism: expectations beyond training
View the documentSession 12. Food issues
View the documentSession 13. The role of the volunteer in development: definition of appropriate technology
View the documentSession 14. Stove promotion and dissemination
View the documentSession 15. Explaining completed cookstoves
View the documentSession 16. Evaluating cookstove efficiency
View the documentSession 17. Diagnosing and repairing malfunctioning cookstoves
View the documentSession 18. Other responses to fuel scarcity
View the documentSession 19. Charcoal production and stoves
View the documentSession 20. Custom and food
View the documentSession 21. Design and construction of the second stove part one: stove base
View the documentSession 22. Alternative cookstoves: presentations
View the documentSession 23. Basic nutrition
View the documentSession 24. Cookstove operation
View the documentSession 25. Cookstove development and innovation
View the documentSession 26. Cookstove information and resources/ evaluation of cookstove training

Session 10. Cookstove construction

PART 1: CONSTRUCTING THE BASE

Total time:

1 hour

Objectives:

* To build a sand/clay cookstove as described in the previous session
* To construct the base of a sand/clay cookstove (optional)

Resources:

Evans and Boutette, Lorena Stoves, pp. 50-51

Materials:

Clay, sand, water, rubble, earthen blocks/brick/concrete rubble/soil-cement blocks/mortared rocks, sifter, shovel, hoe, machete, trowel, lumber

Procedures:

Step 1. (1 hour)
Ask the participants to form the same work groups as in the previous session and to lay out and construct an appropriate stove base using the materials provided.

Trainer Notes

Each group should construct a base for one of the three suggested cookstoves to be built during this phase: the Lorena, the Louga and the Java Chimneyless.

Explain that the stove base should be solid and not shift. Also mention protecting the base from erosion due to surface runoff of water.

Give participants a variety of suggestions, i.e., a level ground base, clay-mortared earthen blocks, cinder blocks, . etc.

Encourage the groups to be creative in their use of materials and to try new approaches. Explain that they should feel free to do this at all stages of the stove construction.

Before the groups begin construction, mention that they should limit the size of their stove (generally the largest being two pots with a chimney) to be certain there will be time to complete the project.

COOKSTOVE CONSTRUCTION
PART 2: BUILDING THE STOVE MASS

Total time:

6 hours

Objective:

To construct the mass of a sand/clay cookstove

Resources:

Evans and Boutette, Lorena Stoves, pp. 50-57

Materials:

Clay, sand, water, sifter, machete, trowels, shovels, hoes, tampers, lumber

Procedures:

Step 1. (6 hours)
Have the work groups construct the stove masses.

Trainer Notes

Tell the work groups they have six hours to complete the stove.

Outline the procedure for building the stove bodies in the following manner:

* Sift sand and clay through a 5mm or 3mm (3/16" or 1/8") screen mesh.
* Mix the dry ingredients to the desired proportions.
* Add water and mix well.
* Apply the mixture to the stove base.
* Add one layer to another, packing each layer well, paying special attention to the edges and being careful to keep the sides straight.
* Continue adding layers until the stove mass attains a height of 30-40cm, depending upon the depth of the pots to be used and the height of the firebox.
* Trim the stove mass sides and fill in mixture where needed.
* Level the surface by gently pulling a wet board back and forth over the surface until it is flat and smooth.

Circulate among the work groups and assist them in the construction process where necessary. Encourage group members to rotate tasks in order to gain experience in all phases of the construction.

Ask the participants to read Lorena Stoves, pp. 58-65, before the next session.

COOKSTOVE CONSTRUCTION
PART 3: FINISHING THE COOKSTOVE

Total time:

3 hours

Objective:

To excavate the potholes and tunnels of an earthen cookstove

Resources:

Evans and Boutette, Lorena Stoves, pp. 58-65

Materials:

Machete, trowel, spoons, nails, sheet metal, wood (for dampers) and chimney pipe (if required)

Procedures:

Step 1. (3 hours)
Briefly review the process of excavating and finishing an earthen cookstove Have participants form their work groups and complete their stoves.

Trainer Notes

Mention that they have three hours to complete their stoves.

Outline the process in the following manner:

* Using the actual pots as templates, position and mark the potholes.
* Locate and mark the position of the damper slot and chimney hole (if necessary).
* Cut the damper slots with a machete.
* Carve out the potholes and chimney with a spoon.
* Cut the firebox entrance and connecting tunnels to the last pothole or chimney hole.
* Finish the potholes with spoons and by rotating the wet pots so that the pots are deeply sunken.
* Build up the baffles under the second and third potholes.
* Construct and insert the dampers.
* Smooth the stove surfaces.

Circulate among the groups offering assistance where necessary.

Refer the work groups to Lorena Stoves, pp. 58-65, for more specific information on completing the stoves.