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close this bookAgricultural Development and Vector-Borne Diseases (FAO - HABITAT - UNEP - WHO, 1996, 91 p.)
close this folderTopic F: Water use in agriculture
View the documentList of slides
View the documentF.1 Eighty percent of freshwater use is for agriculture
View the documentF.2 Water lifting for irrigation by human power, West Africa
View the documentF.3 Water lifting for irrigation by human power, India
View the documentF.4 Water lifting for irrigation by human power, China
View the documentF.5 Water lifting for irrigation by human power, China
View the documentF.6 Water lifting for irrigation by animal power, Egypt
View the documentF.7 Water lifting for irrigation by tractor, Tunisia
View the documentF.8 Lined canal and canaletti, Morocco
View the documentF.9 Hood irrigation, Egypt
View the documentF.10 Furrow irrigation with siphons, Tunisia
View the documentF.11 Sprinkler irrigation, India
View the documentF.12 Central pivot irrigation, Zambia
View the documentF.13 Trickle or drip irrigation, bananas, Egypt
View the documentF.14 Trickle or drip irrigation, tomatoes, Egypt
View the documentF.15 Irrigation canal and turn-outs, Pakistan
View the documentF.16 Effects of lack of infrastructure and poor irrigation management, Pakistan
View the documentF.17 Effects of lack of infrastructure and poor irrigation management, Pakistan
View the documentF.18 Waterlogged fields with crops
View the documentF.19 Waterlogged soybeans in the USA
View the documentF.20 Minor canal with aquatic weeds, Rahad, Sudan
View the documentF.21 An irrigation scheme in an arid area, Chad
View the documentF.22 Tank with dense Salvinia growth, Sri Lanka
View the documentF.23 Water storage for drinking water and livestock
View the documentF.24 Shallow well, Mozambique
View the documentF.25 Improved well, Keita, Niger
View the documentF.26 Village hand pump, Nepal
View the documentF.27 Aquaculture, India
View the documentF.28 Aquaculture in rice fields
View the documentF.29 Trimming and cleaning of a fishpond

F.21 An irrigation scheme in an arid area, Chad


Slide F.21 An irrigation scheme in an arid area, Chad

From the air, the dramatic impact of irrigation development in an arid area is clearly visible. The adverse health implications of such an ecological change may take some time to develop. Schemes are seldom abandoned because of acute health problems, even though the impact of malaria may be fierce. Ill-health does, however, contribute to maintaining the cycle of poverty and underdevelopment, and as a result the social structure of a newly developed irrigation scheme may drastically change. Resettled smallholder farmers may be unable to produce sufficiently to pay back their debts and sell their land to speculators from urban centres. It is difficult to determine to what extent ill-health contributes to such developments.