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close this bookCreative Training - A User's Guide (IIRR, 1998)
View the document(introduction...)
Open this folder and view contentsHow was this user's guide to creative training produced?
View the documentIt came one night...
Open this folder and view contentsBasic facilitation skills
Open this folder and view contentsTraining needs assessment
View the documentWII-FM (what's in it for me?)
Open this folder and view contentsEvaluation techniques
Open this folder and view contentsEnergizers
View the documentForming groups
View the documentCreative congratulations
View the documentRelaxers
Open this folder and view contentsMood setting exercises
Open this folder and view contentsLectures
View the documentMind mapping
View the documentCreative use of overhead projectors
View the documentSlide/photo presentations
View the documentVisual spicers
View the documentPosters as problem-posing materials
Open this folder and view contentsDrawing and chalk talk
Open this folder and view contentsSelf-expression through pictures
View the documentBody language
View the documentVisual gestural communication
View the documentShadow plays
View the documentEasy puppets
View the documentBasic theater skills
View the documentRole play
View the documentAnimated comics role play activity
View the documentFolkstorytelling: Stories come alive!
View the documentOral testimonies
View the documentLifeline
View the documentTimelines
View the documentMap-making
Open this folder and view contentsMaking and using case studies
View the documentAction research
Open this folder and view contentsField trips
Open this folder and view contentsPhysical activities as educational tools
Open this folder and view contentsGames
View the documentContact organizations
View the documentWorkshop participants
View the documentWorkshop production staff

Forming groups

Forming groups is an activity designed to break the participants into smaller groups to maximize their participation and the effectiveness of activities.


Figure

Purpose

Forming groups can be done in creative and less time-consuming ways. Group forming activities ensure distribution of participants coming from the same locality or agency into different groups (when this is appropriate). Some activities could also double as energizers or icebreakers.

Example 1

Color coding

Materials

Name tags in different colors


Figure

People

Unlimited

Method

1. Choose different colors of cards to use as name tags. The number of colors used depends on the number of groups that need forming.

2. Prepare name tags ahead of time (names may be printed in advance or as the participants arrive).

3. Distribute the cards as the participants register, e.g., give first a red card, second a yellow and so on.

Make sure that a fair distribution of colors is handed out.

4. Call the participants and ask each color to occupy a particular area of the venue/hall (e.g., all participants with green-colored name tags, will you please gather at the left side of the hall).

5. Ask groups to submit a list of the members in a group.

Time requirement

Approximately five minutes, in addition to the time used during registration.

Variation

Candies of different flavors may be used. Make sure that the number of flavors correspond to the number of groups that need forming.

Example 2

Parts of a whole

Materials

Parts of a whole (e.g., cutouts of different parts of a plant, such as leaves, flowers, etc., the number of which should correspond to the number of groups to be formed)


Figure

People

Unlimited

Method

1. Distribute the cutouts to the participants

2. Ask participants to write their names on the cutouts

3. Request the participants holding the same plant parts to gather together (e.g., All those who are holding fruits, will you please gather at the center and so on).

Time requirement

Minimal

Outcome

Groups formed according to the number desired

Strengths

Time saving, structured

Limitations

Parts of the subject chosen may not be enough for the number of groups desired.

Example 3

Jigsaw

Materials

Sketches, or magazine pictures or the same theme (e.g., for an environment awareness workshop, sketches of different ecosystems can be used such as coral ecosystems, seagrass ecosystems, etc). The number of illustrations to be used will depend on the number of groups to be formed.


Figure

People

30 to 40

Time requirement

10 minutes

Method

1. Cut the illustrations into pieces, corresponding to the number of participants. Make sure that the same number of pieces are made out of the different illustrations.

2. Distribute the pieces, making sure that all participants have a piece.

3. Ask each participant to write their name on the piece handed to them.

4. At a signal, ask the participants to begin matching the piece they are holding with that of other participants.

5. Request the group to tape the pieces together and post the end product on the wall.

Limitations

Requires knowing exact numbers of participants before cutting the jigsaws.

Option

A prize may be given to the group which forms first.

Hint

If using sketches, have each one on a different colored piece of cards to facilitate grouping formation.

Sketches must not be too complicated to shorten the time needed to form the jigsaws.

Example 4

Barnyard game

Materials

Pieces of paper

People

Up to 40


Figure

Time requirement

10 to 15 minutes

Method

1. Distribute pieces of paper with names of animals. The number of animals will depend on number of groups to be formed. Instruct the participants not to show others the paper given to them.

2. Ask participants to go around making the noise of the animal written on the paper given to them and look for participants who are making the same noise.

Variation

Participants could be asked to act out certain professions (e.g., drivers, carpenters, etc.) or activities (swimming, jogging, etc.)

Option

A prize may be given to the group which forms first

Remember

Do not use animals that are considered holy to the religious beliefs of some of your participants.

Also, some animals may be considered too disgusting for some people to be associated with.

Example 5

The boat is sinking

Materials

None

People

Up to 40


Figure

Time requirement

20 minutes or more

Method

1. Assign an "it"

2. Instruct the participants that they must group together according to the number called out by the "it" (e.g., The boat is sinking group into 6!).

3. Several groupings may be done before settling to the number of groups desired by the facilitator for the next activity.

Note

Some people may not want to join an activity that involves running around and being touched or pulled.

Example 6

Fruit salad

Materials

Pieces of paper

People

Up to 40


Figure

Time requirement

15 to 20 minutes

Method

1. Arrange chairs in a circle for participants to occupy. The number of chairs should be one less then the number of participants.

2. Distribute pieces of paper with a name of the fruit, the number of which depends on the number of groups desired.

3. Assign an "it" who stands in the middle.

4. Inform the participants that when the "it" mentions a fruit; only the persons whose papers are marked with the fruit change seats (e.g., mango!) When fruit salad is mentioned, everybody changes seats. The participant who can not find a seat becomes the next "it".

The activity could go on as desired

5. Once everyone is energized, stop the game and request participants assigned to the same fruit to group themselves.

Caution

The chairs must be sturdy enough so as not to be damaged or fall apart when participants scramble for seats.