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close this bookDying of Sadness: Gender Sexual Violence and the HIV Epidemic (UNDP, 1999, 17 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPREFACE
View the documentSUMMARY
View the documentI. DEFINING SEXUAL VIOLENCE
View the documentll. THE SCALE OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE
View the documentIII. SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN CONFLICT SITUATIONS
View the documentIV. DETERMINANTS OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE
Open this folder and view contentsV. CONSEQUENCES OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE
Open this folder and view contentsVI. FUTURE WORK
View the documentAnnex 1: Sexual Violence - International Conferences and Conventions
View the documentAnnex 2: International Guidelines on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights
View the documentReferences & Suggested Reading

PREFACE

Since its inception, the HIV and Development Programme has drawn attention to the complex and dynamic relationship which exists between the HIV/AIDS epidemic and development. Many of the commonly acknowledged impediments to development, such as social and economic inequality, environmental degradation, political instability, civil disorder and the absence of good governance are also key driving forces behind the spread and unfolding of the epidemic.

Through an extensive range of publications, and in particular through its Issues Papers, the Programme has encouraged consideration of the epidemic in relation to critical aspects of development.

This series of papers which explores specific areas of the relationship between the epidemic and gender, has been made possible through funding from UNAIDS and has been produced in collaboration with UNICEF and the World Bank.

The views expressed in these papers are those of the authors and may not necessarily reflect those of the United Nations Development Programme. We encourage reproduction of the material and welcome acknowledgement, comment and feedback.

Mina Mauerstein-Bail
Manager
HIV and Development Programme

"I was not badly wounded, but I was hurt and could not walk properly. I still wonder, even today, if I have been given AIDS. I have never seen a doctor because I have no money. "

"It is as if we are now beginning a new life. Our past is so sad. We are not understood by society... We are not protected against anything. Widows are without families, without houses, without money. We become crazy. We aggravate people with our problems. We are the living dead. "

"Many women begged to be killed during the genocide. They were refused and told 'you will die of sadness'. "

Survivors of the Rwandan Genocide

"..women and men, boys and girls of all ages are at sexual risk - particularly when the purpose is to eliminate another ethnic group. The rape of men and their sexual mutilation are surprisingly common but vastly underreported. Men rarely seek direct help for such experiences, but their effects may be manifested later in post-traumatic stress. "

Long 1997 p. 130