Cover Image
close this bookClimate, Biodiversity, and Forests - Issues and Opportunities Emerging from the Kyoto Protocol (WRI, 1998, 40 pages)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentForeword
close this folderIntroduction
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentGetting to Kyoto
View the documentKyoto Protocol Overview
View the documentSynergies Between Climate Mitigation and Biodiversity Conservation
View the documentUnresolved Issues That Impede Capturing Climate and Biodiversity Benefits
close this folderGeneric Issues Associated with Forests and Land-Use Change in The Kyoto Protocol
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentForests as a Distraction from Reducing Energy-Related Emissions
View the documentForest Options Could Become a Loophole
View the documentThe Possibility of Negative Environmental Impacts
View the documentThe Question of Property Rights
View the documentThreats to National Sovereignty
close this folderThe Treatment of Forests and Land-Use Change in Industrialized Countries
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderCurrent Protocol Rules for Domestic Inventories of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Forests and Land-Use Change
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentThe 1990 Base Year
View the documentThe 2008-2012 Commitment Period
View the documentThe 1990-2008 Interim Period
View the documentIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Guidelines for Domestic Inventories of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Forests and Land-Use Change
View the documentDefining and Tracking Deforestation
close this folderWhat Is Left Uncounted in National Inventories?
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentForest Harvest and Management
View the documentForest Degradation
View the documentStorage in Wood Products
View the documentForest Fires
View the documentSoil Carbon
View the documentMethods for Including Additional Activities Under Domestic Inventories
close this folderThe Treatment of Forests and Land-Use Change Under the Market Mechanisms for Reductions Between Developed Countries
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentProject-Based Credit Trading
View the documentEmissions Trading
close this folderThe Role of Forests and Land-Use Change in Developing Countries
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentThe Clean Development Mechanism
close this folderProject Eligibility
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentForest Harvest and Management
View the documentCarbon Stored in Wood Products
View the documentForest Conservation
View the documentImproving Agricultural Productivity
View the documentFire Suppression
View the documentContributing Elements for a Successful CDM
close this folderTechnical Concerns Associated with Measuring and Verifying Forest and Land-Use Change Emissions and Reductions
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentEstablishing a Reference Case
View the documentLeakage
View the documentPermanence of Reductions
View the documentMeasurement Accuracy
View the documentRecommendations
View the documentGlossary
View the documentNotes

(introduction...)

For more than a decade, the community of nations has engaged in a difficult and crucial debate that has set the framework for international efforts to reduce the risk of climate change into the next century. That debate took a significant new turn in December 1997, when nations met in Kyoto, Japan, to forge a follow-on Protocol to the original 1992 Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Kyoto Protocol marks the first international agreement to place legally binding limits on greenhouse gas emissions from developed countries but leaves many issues to be resolved in future negotiations.

One of the most important areas yet to be resolved concerns how much of a role forests and land-use change will play under the Kyoto Protocol. They are both a part of the problem and of the solution of climate change. Saving or increasing forest cover, particularly of old-growth forests, stores carbon, thus keeping it out of the atmosphere and slowing global warming. Conversely, the global loss of forests plays a significant role in increasing the risks of climate change. Forest conversion has contributed an estimated 30 percent of the atmospheric buildup in carbon dioxide.1

This report focuses on the ways in which forests and land-use change can both exacerbate and mitigate climate change. It identifies the opportunities the Protocol presents regarding the conservation, improved management, and restoration of forests and considers some of the reasons the issue has

proven controversial. Finally, the paper highlights key future decisions that will determine whether these opportunities are seized and examines how these decisions can be made to work for climate, forests, and biodiversity.