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close this bookForestry Training Manual: Inter-America Region (Peace Corps, 1986)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentTrainer guidelines
Open this folder and view contentsTraining program overview
View the documentForestry observation guide for site visit
Open this folder and view contentsGetting ready
View the documentConducting the training program
View the documentWeekly evaluation form
View the documentSession I - Welcome, expectations, and evaluation criteria
View the documentDaily schedule for technical training I
View the documentSession II - Special projects
View the documentSession III - The forest of the world, Peace Corps forestry goals, the individual volunteers' roles
View the documentSession IV - Language class
View the documentSession V - Record keeping
View the documentSession VI - Journal keeping and setting
View the documentSession VII - Flowers, seeds, the beginning
View the documentSession VIII - Spanish language class
View the documentSession IX - Non-verbal communication
View the documentSession X - Basic site selection, planning and layout of a nursery
View the documentSession XI - Spanish lesson
View the documentSession XII - Cultural values
View the documentSession XIII - Soil preparation, seed bed sowing, and reproduction by clippings
View the documentSession XIV - Spanish language
View the documentSession XV - Communication through illustration
View the documentSession XVI - Fertilizers, watering and containers
View the documentSession XVII - Spanish language
View the documentSession XVIII - Protection and record keeping
View the documentSession XIX - Individual interviews
View the documentWeekly evaluation form
View the documentSession XX - Planting trees
View the documentSession XXI - Spanish language session
View the documentSession XXII - Introduction to extension
View the documentSession XXIII - The principals of pruning and thinning learning how to make and use a diameter tape
View the documentSession XXIV - Spanish language
View the documentSession XXV - Volunteer's role as an extensionist
View the documentSession XXVI - Pacing, plane table, rustic transit and compass
View the documentSession XXVII - Spanish language
View the documentSession XVIII - Forestry extension
View the documentSession XXIX - Forest menstruation
View the documentSession XXX - Spanish language
View the documentSession XXXI - Working with groups as an extension worker
View the documentSession XXXII - Agro-forestry
View the documentSession XXXIII - Spanish language
View the documentSession XXXIV - Lesson plan and use of visual AIDS in teaching
View the documentSession XXXV - Small research projects
View the documentSession XXXVI - Individual interviews
View the documentSession XXXVII - Soils
View the documentSession XXXVIII - Spanish language
View the documentSession XXXIX - Community analysis introduction
View the documentSession XL - Soil erosion
View the documentSession XLI - Spanish language
View the documentSession XLII - Problem analysis
View the documentSession XLIII - Watershed management
View the documentSession XLIV - Spanish language
View the documentSession XLV - Review of expectations - Mid way
View the documentSession XLVI - Spanish language
View the documentSession XLVII - Species report
View the documentSession XLVIII - Forestry issues
View the documentSession XLIX - Spanish language
View the documentSession L - Field trip overview
View the documentSession LI - Ecology teams give presentations
View the documentSession LII - Individual interviews
View the documentSession LIII - Review of field trips
View the documentSession LIV - Project planning: Goal setting
View the documentSession LV - Spanish language
View the documentSession LVI - Resources
View the documentSession LVII - Compost heap. Insect collection. Light gaps
View the documentSession LVIII - Spanish language
View the documentSession LIX - Cultural shock - Are we ready for it?
View the documentSession LX - Grafting and fruit trees
View the documentSession LXI - Spanish language
View the documentSession LXII - Professional approaches to interaction with host country officials
View the documentSession LXIII - Final interviews
View the documentSession LXIV - Graduation

Session XII - Cultural values

Total Time:

Goals:

- To get in touch with our own value system.
- To see what we have learned so far about host country cultural values.
- To explore commonalities and differences.
- To find ways of accepting cultural differences.

Overview

In this session, trainees will he asked to list their own cultural values. For many this will be a repeat, but the purpose here is to see how many more of their own values they have identified since living in host country and to look at host country cultural values, so that trainees can begin to see commonalities and differences. Finally, trainees will be seeking ways to accept the differences. This lays the ground work for extension work training later in the program.

Exercise

1. Cultural value explorations: mine, ours, theirs, acceptance.

Materials

Flip charts, marker pens, tape.

Exercise I:

Cultural values: An Exploration - Mine, Ours, Theirs, Acceptance

Total Time:

1 hour 45 minutes

Overview

To explore different cultural systems. Find ways to accept the differences.

Procedures

Time

Activities

5 minutes

Trainer posts on newsprint the following diagram:



BELIEFS



CULTURE



VALUES



BEHAVIOR


Give a brief lecture stating that values are not good or bad that they just are. The reason we want to take a good look at our cultural values in this session is to start at just basically a very general point - culture. The unique lifestyles of a particular group of people is a learned behavior that is communicable. We are able to see two very key concepts of culture. It is communicable, thank goodness. It means you can learn something about it. Because if it were not communicable, we would have nothing to do here today or for the rest of your volunteer service. To learn about the behavior of others is also very meaningful, not only in a social sense, but in a management sense, because I think it is important for people to understand the influence that environment has on culture, on you and understand that you are not "born" with a culture. You can be born into a culture but you are not born a culture, if I could make that distinction.


Another positive aspect of learned behavior says to us that we can also not only broaden our appreciation of other cultures but broaden our ability to participate in other cultures, in another cultural milieu.


To start our participation in this culture we need to go back to ourselves and then come forward.

15 minutes

2. Trainer asks trainees to make a list of their own cultural values. You may have done this before so it will he easy. You may also notice that you have gotten in touch with values you were unaware of since coming to host country.

30 minutes

3. Trainer now asks participants to form groups of four. Share their lists of cultural values and look for similarities and differences in their lists.

15 minutes

4. Trainer now asks group to share their differences and write them on newsprint. Then asks for ways in which we accept differences in our own culture.

20 minutes

5. Trainer now asks groups to list as many cultural values of the host country as they can. Trainer asks that after they have completed this list, they once again check for commonalities and differences.

15 minutes

6. Trainer now asks the groups to make a list on newsprint of ideas they may have for accepting these differences.

Trainer's Note: List generated from pilot program is included as a guide.

15 minutes

7. Trainer now requests that small groups share with large groups their ideas. Trainer now leads discussion of how these ideas can be used in the volunteer experience.

List of Ways of Accepting Differences

- Adjust to environment.
- Have respect for culture and customs.
- Cultural sensitivity.
- Patience.
- Be outgoing.
- Empathy.
- Introspection.
- Be flexible enough to (tolerate, accept) values different from our own.
- Educate ourselves to explain motives for values.
- Realize our values are as different to them as theirs to us.
- Conformity/compromise.
- Understanding that the differences are deeprooted and cultural.
- Ability to modify outward behavior without modifying inward values.
- Keep an open mind, culturally and personally.
- Good sense of humor (able to laugh at self).