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close this bookCase Studies on Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific - Fiji (UNEVOC - ACEID, 1996, 28 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentKEY FACTS
View the document1. INTRODUCTION
View the document2. DEFINITION
View the document3. THE FIJI ECONOMY
View the document4. MANPOWER SITUATION IN RELATION TO THE ECONOMY
View the document5. IMPACT OF ECONOMIC STRATEGY ON TRAINING
Open this folder and view contents6. INSTITUTIONAL TRAINING
View the document7. OTHER INSTITUTIONS
View the document8. NON-INSTITUTIONAL TRAINING
View the document9. ACCREDITATION AND RECOGNITION
View the document10. IMPACT OF TRAINING ON THE LABOUR MARKET
View the document11. FUTURE DIRECTIONS
View the document12. POLICY ENVIRONMENT FOR THE FUTURE
Open this folder and view contentsAPPENDICES

5. IMPACT OF ECONOMIC STRATEGY ON TRAINING

How then does this economic strategy impact on training? Although capacity utilization, including the absorption of already trained and educated people into vacancies created by emigration, will continue to allow growth in the short term, new investments will be needed particularly in manufacturing, tourism and in agricultural activities other than sugar. The prospects of growth in these areas clearly indicate a number of manpower development priorities mainly in the private sector:

(a) (first) skill development will be required for the manufacturing sector if growth is to be guaranteed and sustained. A dynamic manufacturing sector will require both general and industry specific training. The introduction of new products and new technologies will require technical and supervisory manpower;

(b) in agriculture, training will be needed for the introduction of new crops, new farming techniques, new storage and processing technologies; and

(c) investigations that were undertaken for the FIT through AIDAB into the development of a new School of Hotel and Tourism in Nadi is an indication of the very heavy demand for training from this sector (this project has been placed on hold mainly because of the costs of the original concept).

According to a recent survey undertaken by the Fiji National Training Council on behalf of the ILO Asian and Pacific Skills Development Programme (APSDEP) on the need for training in advanced technology in Fiji, there is a serious shortage of Tradesmen and Technicians in all engineering fields (mechanical, electrical, electronics, automotive, machine tool) and also in the building trades. Emerging skills for which there do not appear to be adequate facilities for training include electrical and electronics skills, computer technology, although the Fiji Institute of Technology does offer Trade Certificate Courses in Electrical Engineering and Electronics, and Diploma courses in Electrical and Telecommunication Engineering.

In addition to technical skills, the Fiji Government's economic strategy, and special emphasis on enabling ethnic Fijians to play a greater role in the economy, demands that opportunities be also readily available for training in business or entrepreneurial skills. As industrial organizations strive for greater efficiencies in their operations with the eventual objective of achieving competitiveness in the world marketplace, the demand for workers, even at the supervisory level, to have a strong accounting background, will become greater and greater, and middle and higher management positions will be the purview of only those with degrees in accounting and business administration (MBA), and of course relevant and successful work experience.