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close this bookCase Studies on Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific - Fiji (UNEVOC - ACEID, 1996, 28 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentKEY FACTS
View the document1. INTRODUCTION
View the document2. DEFINITION
View the document3. THE FIJI ECONOMY
View the document4. MANPOWER SITUATION IN RELATION TO THE ECONOMY
View the document5. IMPACT OF ECONOMIC STRATEGY ON TRAINING
Open this folder and view contents6. INSTITUTIONAL TRAINING
View the document7. OTHER INSTITUTIONS
View the document8. NON-INSTITUTIONAL TRAINING
View the document9. ACCREDITATION AND RECOGNITION
View the document10. IMPACT OF TRAINING ON THE LABOUR MARKET
View the document11. FUTURE DIRECTIONS
View the document12. POLICY ENVIRONMENT FOR THE FUTURE
Open this folder and view contentsAPPENDICES

8. NON-INSTITUTIONAL TRAINING

As indicated earlier in this overview not all training is undertaken at institutions that have been especially set up for training. A great deal of job-specific training is undertaken in-house and on-the-job by most of the larger employers in training centres developed within each organization and with their own certified training officers. Such organizations as the Public Service Commission through the Government Training Centre, Air Pacific Limited, Fiji Electricity Authority, Carpenters Fiji Limited, Civil Aviation Authority of Fiji, Air Terminal Services, Eastern Manufacturing Group (a group of six companies) and Fiji Sugar Corporation are examples of organizations which carry out their own job-specific training in certain skill areas in-house.

In all in-house training programmes the FNTC features prominently in covering the cost of training from a grant of funds up to 90 per cent of the value of the levy paid to the FNTC for training, and in the provision of resource personnel from the Industry Training Boards to help with the training.