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close this bookCase Studies on Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific - Fiji (UNEVOC - ACEID, 1996, 28 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentKEY FACTS
View the document1. INTRODUCTION
View the document2. DEFINITION
View the document3. THE FIJI ECONOMY
View the document4. MANPOWER SITUATION IN RELATION TO THE ECONOMY
View the document5. IMPACT OF ECONOMIC STRATEGY ON TRAINING
Open this folder and view contents6. INSTITUTIONAL TRAINING
View the document7. OTHER INSTITUTIONS
View the document8. NON-INSTITUTIONAL TRAINING
View the document9. ACCREDITATION AND RECOGNITION
View the document10. IMPACT OF TRAINING ON THE LABOUR MARKET
View the document11. FUTURE DIRECTIONS
View the document12. POLICY ENVIRONMENT FOR THE FUTURE
Open this folder and view contentsAPPENDICES

7. OTHER INSTITUTIONS

Because the teaching and medical services fall under the general heading of 'essential services' particular emphasis is being made in this draft paper on the impact being made by the graduates of the Fiji School of Nursing, the Fiji Medical School, the Lautoka Teachers' College, Corpus Christi Teachers' College (Catholic) and the recently (1992) established Fiji College of Advanced Education, on the demands for medical and teaching personnel. Suffice to say that in the forseeable future Fiji, through these institutions, will not be able to fully satisfy shortages in these two very important areas.

It is however important to note the ongoing efforts by the Ministry of Education in its attempts to provide a more broad-based education for young people in especially rural secondary schools, by establishing thirty vocational training centres attached to these schools. The courses being run are two-year programmes in:

· tailoring and garment production;
· catering and food preparation;
· carpentry and joinery;
· automotive engineering; and
· a one-year course in secretarial studies.

While the curricula for these courses are of a standard that would allow successful graduates to enrol in some FIT courses or obtain paid employment at a lower skill level, the courses also provide a trade skill base for rural living. In general these centres have no significant impact on employer needs. In addition there are about 22 private providers of training in a limited number of skills mainly related to secretarial and commercial courses, including computer applications. Apart from two or three of these private institutions which provide training at a relatively high skill level and are linked to Australasian institutions, the others are small with minimum facilities and offer courses at low skill levels by local industry standards.