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close this bookCommunity-Based Longitudinal Nutrition and Health Studies: Classical Examples from Guatemala, Haiti and Mexico (INFDC, 1995, 184 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentContributors to this volume
close this folderPreface
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close this folderIntroduction
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close this folder1. A comparison of supplementary feeding and medical care of preschool children in Guatemala, 1959-1964
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View the documentIntroduction
View the documentExperimental design (I: Scrimshaw et al., 1967a)
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View the documentCollateral studies
View the documentDiscussion of results
View the documentMedical, social, and public health benefits of the study
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close this folder2. The Santa María Cauqué study: Health and survival of Mayan Indians under deprivation, Guatemala
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View the documentMethodology
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View the documentDeterminants of health
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close this folder3. The effect of malnutrition on human development
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View the documentIntroduction: Chronic malnutrition
View the documentA poor village: Its reality and problems
View the documentThe longitudinal intervention study: Design and implementation
View the documentThe first eight months of life
View the documentThe ''valley of death'' between 8 and 20 months
View the documentThe preschool survivor and the nutritional crisis at school entrance
View the documentThe teenager who was malnourished as a child
View the documentComments: Nutrition in the life cycle and social development
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close this folder4. The INCAP longitudinal study (1969-1977) and its follow-up (1988-1989): An overview of results
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View the documentThe INCAP longitudinal study (1969-1977)
View the documentGuatemalan follow-up study (1987-1988)
View the documentConcluding remarks
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close this folder5. A prospective study of community health and nutrition in rural Haiti from 1968 to 1993
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View the documentBackground on Haiti
View the documentMaterials and methods
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(introduction...)

Editor: Nevin S. Scrimshaw

Dedicated to John E. Gordon (1890-1983), pioneer in longitudinal community-based nutrition and health studies

© Copyright 1995 International Foundation for Developing Countries (INFDC). Boston, MA USA. All Rights Reserved.
ISBN Number: 0-9635522-6-0

Community-Based Longitudinal Nutrition and Health Studies:
Classical Examples from Guatemala, Haiti, and Mexico

There is no substitute for longitudinal community-based studies to identify the multiple causative factors and the functional consequences of disease in a population. Unlike clinical trials, they probe for the host, agent, and environmental factors responsible for disease and suggest health related behavior that can reduce or eliminate the disease burden studies. Yet such studies are so difficult and costly to organize and sustain that relatively concisely five classical nutrition oriented field studies, one in Mexico, three in Guatemala and one in Haiti. For students they illustrate the steps involved in designing, implementing, and interpreting longitudinal, community-based health studies. Health professionals at all levels will benefit from the insights into developing preventive measures and evaluating their effectiveness.

International Nutrition Foundation for Developing Countries (INFDC)

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The digitalization of this publication was made possible by a grant from the Nestloundation