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close this bookBest Practices: Strengthening Policy Research Capacity around the World (IFPRI, 2000, 6 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentWHY CAPACITY STRENGTHENING FOR DEVELOPMENT MATTERS
View the documentOPTIONS FOR STRENGTHENING INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY
View the documentOPTIONS FOR STRENGTHENING INDIVIDUALS’ CAPACITY
View the documentEXAMPLES OF IFPRI’s IMPACT ON POLICY RESEARCH CAPACITY AROUND THE WORLD
View the documentSELECTED TRAINING AND CAPACITY STRENGTHENING BY IFPRI AND THEIR IMPACTS, 1985-1999
View the documentIFPRI’s TRAINING AND CAPACITY-STRENGTHENING ACTIVITIES
View the documentFIVE LESSONS ON CAPACITY STRENGTHENING
View the documentFUTURE CHALLENGES

SELECTED TRAINING AND CAPACITY STRENGTHENING BY IFPRI AND THEIR IMPACTS, 1985-1999

Location/time period

Institutional linkages

Methods employed

Impacts

Pakistan,
1985-1994

Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Ministry of Food and Agriculture

Collaborative research, visiting research

Policy research leading to major policy changes

Bangladesh,
1988-2000

Ministry of Food, Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies, Dhaka University

Short-term training, visiting research, contract research, collaborative research/advice

Major policy changes, local capacity for policy research

Malawi,
1992-2000

Ministry of Agriculture, Bunda College of Agriculture at University of Malawi

Long-term training, short-term training, visiting research, collaborative research

University emerged as regional center for policy analysis training

Ghana,
1994-1997

National Development Planning Commission (NDPC), University of Development Studies

Collaborative research, personalized training, multidisciplinary training, decentralized training

Decentralized capacity for food and nutrition monitoring systems

Viet Nam,
1995-2000

Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development

Visiting research, short-term training

Acceptance of major policy change/policy analysis capacity for continuation

Mozambique,
1996-2000

Ministry of Finance, Eduardo Mondlane University

Personalized training, visiting research, collaborative multidisciplinary training

Regional capacity for food and nutrition policy analysis

East Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda),
1998-2002

National policymakers, researchers, and NGO members

Consultative national policy dialogue, technical support of in-country research, training and exchange programs

Still in progress; signs of improved national and regional capacity to generate and use food policy analysis

For further information, please contact:
Suresh Babu (s.babu@cgiar.org) or
Klaus von Grebmer (k.vongrebmer@cgiar.org)
Communications Division/IFPRI

Contract research. Contract research provides grants to developing-country organizations to conduct research on a topic of regional interest. It generates a body of knowledge while building policy research and analysis capacity with minimal supervisory support.

Visiting research. As part of joint research programs, collaborators visit developed-country organizations and work with researchers there on analyzing data and preparing reports on topics relevant to solving policy problems of their countries. This approach may involve short-term visits to developed-country institutions or long-term interaction and exchange of high-level policy advisory staff from developing countries under the supervision of recognized experts in the field.

Joint product approach. Innovative capacity-strengthening programs can achieve more than one objective. This approach offers support to developing-country students in master’s and Ph.D. programs through collaborative research programs in developing countries. Students’ dissertation research is conducted on a topic of significant policy relevance to the home-country policymakers. Outputs include both the degree and the policy-relevant dissertation.

Short-term training workshops. Workshops on policy analysis for civil servants and policymakers in developing countries typically last 2 - 4 weeks and include lectures, seminars, group discussions, and hands-on exercises. These workshops develop narrow but highly relevant skills and can increase the demand for research outputs.