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close this bookBest Practices: Strengthening Policy Research Capacity around the World (IFPRI, 2000, 6 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentWHY CAPACITY STRENGTHENING FOR DEVELOPMENT MATTERS
View the documentOPTIONS FOR STRENGTHENING INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY
View the documentOPTIONS FOR STRENGTHENING INDIVIDUALS’ CAPACITY
View the documentEXAMPLES OF IFPRI’s IMPACT ON POLICY RESEARCH CAPACITY AROUND THE WORLD
View the documentSELECTED TRAINING AND CAPACITY STRENGTHENING BY IFPRI AND THEIR IMPACTS, 1985-1999
View the documentIFPRI’s TRAINING AND CAPACITY-STRENGTHENING ACTIVITIES
View the documentFIVE LESSONS ON CAPACITY STRENGTHENING
View the documentFUTURE CHALLENGES

FUTURE CHALLENGES

Despite the efforts of several organizations in the past four decades, success in strengthening policy research and analysis capacity has been limited. Resources to support capacity-strengthening activities are on the decline, and long-term support is almost nonexistent. Trained personnel have been lost through death and disease, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.

New digital technologies are creating new opportunities for sharing research methods and results with developing-country partners and institutions. Distance learning and other new knowledge networks may prove to be cost-effective in the long run. Although information technologies can bring developing countries closer to learning resources, access to these technologies remains a challenge.

Globalization exposes developing-country policymakers and policy advisers to new opportunities, but taking advantage of these opportunities requires strong in-country capacity for policy research and formulation. The recent trend toward decentralized planning and policymaking in many developing countries will require rethinking the approaches to policy analysis capacity strengthening.

To meet changing needs, capacity-strengthening efforts must be an integral part of policy research projects and programs for a long time to come. It can not be overemphasized that strengthening the ability of local institutions to generate and receive policy information can result in better policies and effective action that will not only save resources but also improve the well-being of millions of poor and malnourished in the developing world.

For More Information

Babu, S. C., and K. von Grebmer. 2000. Strengthening policy research capacity around the world: The impact of IFPRI’s approach. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C. Mimeo.

Babu, S. C. 1999. Impact of policy research on resource allocation and food security: A case study of IFPRI’s research in Bangladesh. Impact Assessment Discussion Paper No. 13. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C.

Handa, S. 1999. Summary of activities of IFPRI’s assistance to the Faculty of Agronomy and Forestry Engineering, Eduardo Mondlane University, and Poverty Alleviation Unit, Ministry of Finance. Final Report. Training and Capacity Strengthening in Mozambique: Project 2525-000. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C.

Paarlberg, R. 1999. External impact assessment of IFPRI’s 2020 Vision for Food, Agriculture, and the Environment Initiative. Impact Assessment Discussion Paper No. 10. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C.

Ryan, J. G. 1999. Assessing the impact of rice policy changes in Viet Nam and the contribution of policy research. Impact Assessment Discussion Paper No. 8. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C.

Ryan, J. G. 1999. Assessing the impact of policy research and capacity building in IFPRI with Malawi. Impact Assessment Discussion Paper No. 9. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C.


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