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close this bookMalnutrition and Infection - A review - Nutrition policy discussion paper No. 5 (UNSSCN, 1989, 144 p.)
close this folderMALNUTRITION AND INFECTION - by Andrew Tomkins and Fiona Watson1
close this folder3. INFECTION AND RISK OF MALNUTRITION
View the document3.1 MECHANISMS OF NUTRITIONAL CHANGES DURING INFECTION
View the document3.2 GENERAL INFECTIONS
View the document3.3 DIARRHOEA
View the document3.4 MEASLES
View the document3.5 MALARIA
View the document3.6 RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS
View the document3.7 INTESTINAL PARASITES
View the document3.8 AIDS

3.2 GENERAL INFECTIONS

Prospective studies of growth and morbidity in children have identified certain infections as particularly important as causes of poor growth. Among these, diarrhoea, respiratory infections and malaria are the most prevalent. The impact of infection on growth may vary according to the previous nutritional status of the child, the availability of food and the time available for feeding, cultural beliefs and access to health facilities. For instance, in a relatively underprivileged community in rural Gambia (Rowland et al 1977) there was a marked negative effect of diarrhoea and malaria on weight gain. Diarrhoea also caused a reduction in rates of height increase. In a study of better off children in urban Gambia, however, the growth faltering was less impressive though there was some relationship with diarrhoea and lower respiratory tract infections (Rowland et al 1988).