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close this bookGlobal Water Supply and Sanitation Assessment 2000 Report (UNICEF - WSSCC - WHO, 2000, 90 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentForeword by the Director-General of WHO and the Executive Director of UNICEF
View the documentForeword by the Chairperson of the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council
View the documentPreface
Open this folder and view contents1. The Global Water Supply and Sanitation Assessment 2000
Open this folder and view contents2. Global status
Open this folder and view contents3. Sector performance
Open this folder and view contents4. Water supply and sanitation in large cities
Open this folder and view contents5. Challenges, future needs and prospects
Open this folder and view contents6. Africa
Open this folder and view contents7. Asia
Open this folder and view contents8. Latin America and the Caribbean
Open this folder and view contents9. Oceania
Open this folder and view contents10. Europe
Open this folder and view contents11. Northern America
View the documentReferences
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentAnnex A: Methodology for the Global Water Supply and Sanitation Assessment 2000
View the documentBack Cover

Acknowledgements

A large number of dedicated professionals in the water supply and sanitation sector have contributed greatly to the Global Assessment 2000. The staff of WHO and UNICEF country offices worked alongside national government officials to obtain the data which are presented and discussed in this report. Without their hard and valuable work, and support, the Global Assessment 2000 would not have been possible.

Special mention should be made of the staff of the WHO Regional Offices who coordinated the process of data collection in their respective regions and provided many useful inputs: Firdu Zawide, Emmiliene Anikpo and Honorat B. Hounkpatin from the WHO Regional Office for Africa; Luiz Carlos Rangel Soares, Sergio Caporali and Marta Bryce from the WHO Regional Office for the Americas; Kew Khosh-Chashm from the WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean; Kathy Pond from the WHO Regional Office for Europe; John Pospisilik and Terrence Thompson from the WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia; and Ali Basaran and Paul Heinsbroek, from the WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific. Particular thanks go to the WHO Regional Office for the Americas, including its Pan-American Centre for Sanitary Engineering and Environmental Sciences (CEPIS) and UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia for organizing regional and sub-regional workshops on indicators and data collection, and for promoting extensive reflection at the country level on the status of the water supply and sanitation sector, which has greatly contributed to the global assessment process.

The agencies that have produced survey data, such as Macro International, funded primarily by the U.S. Agency for International Development (Demographic and Health Surveys), and UNICEF (Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS)) and their local counterparts, should be thanked for providing some of the basic information for this assessment.

Numerous specialists in the sector have given their time to comment on the methodology of the Global Assessment 2000 and on the various drafts of this report. They are: Brian Appleton, Communications Officer, Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), Geneva, Switzerland; Samuel Bickel, Regional Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, UNICEF, Bogota, Colombia; Eveline Bolt, Head, Research and Development, IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, Delft, Netherlands; Margaret Catley-Carlson, Consultant, New York, USA; Piers Cross, Manager, Water and Sanitation Programme (WSP), World Bank, Washington, DC, USA; Ian Curtis, Department for International Development (DFID), London, England; Alejandro Deeb, WSP, World Bank, Washington, DC, USA; Gerardo Galvis, Director, Research and Development Institute (CINARA), Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia; Richard Jolly, Chairman, WSSCC, New York, USA; Jon W. Lane, Consultant, London, England; A. Milburn, Executive Director, International Water Association (IWA), London, England; Pierre Najlis, Consultant, New York, USA; Jef Paulussen, Water Supply Company, Flanders, Belgium; Mr Roger Pearson, Regional Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, UNICEF, Kathmandu, Nepal; Mayling Simpson-Hebert, Consultant, Steamboat Springs, USA; Odyer Sperandio, Consultant, Geneva, Switzerland; Paul Taylor, Consultant, Harare, Zimbabwe; Cheick Toure, Director, Regional Centre for Drinking Water and Sanitation (CREPA), Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; Dennis Warner, Consultant, Felgeres, France; and Helmut Weidel, Director of Mountain Unlimited, Vienna, Austria. Their time and effort are greatly appreciated.

The United Kingdom Department for International Development is to be greatly thanked for providing substantial funding for technical assistance through its resource centre WELL (Water and Environmental Health at London and Loughborough).

The World Health Organization and the United Nation Children's Fund would like to acknowledge the important contribution of WELL to the overall process, particularly in having undertaken the majority of data compilation and analysis for the assessment, and the drafting of the text of this publication. Particular thanks go to Caroline Hunt who provided technical management, with quality assurance and guidance from Sandy Cairncross and Pete Kolsky, and overall support from the WELL team in conducting the above tasks. UNICEF initiated the development of the statistical methodology, provided most of the summary sheets on household surveys, and compiled the data and analysed the coverage trends for the 16 most populous developing countries of the world. WHO coordinated the overall assessment process and lead the revision of earlier drafts to produce the final version of this document.

Finally, mention is made of Jose Hueb, Jamie Bartram and Richard Helmer from WHO, and Michel Saint-Lot, Gourisankar Ghosh, Gareth Jones and Roeland Monasch from UNICEF, who were responsible for the Global Assessment 2000 within the framework of the WHO and UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme.


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Photography: UNICEF/Lemoyne