Cover Image
close this bookThe Packaging of Fruit Juice and Non-Carbonated Fruit Drinks (CDI, 1998, 87 p.)
close this folderIII. THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF PACKAGING
close this folderA - SHORT SHELF-LIFE FRESH PRODUCTS
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1. Plastic bottle
View the document2. Plastic drum
View the document3. Pre-formed plastic cup
View the document4. Pre-formed pouch
View the document5. Gable-top carton box

(introduction...)

Definition:

Products with a shelf-life of 2 to 4 weeks which must be stored in a cold chain (temperature less than +7°C); this process is used for natural fruit juices.

This type of product has shown a marked development in Europe in recent years because of increased consumer demand for natural products.

Principle:

Most juices on the market are obtained from the extraction of pulp from fresh fruit which is then pasteurised (at temperatures between 80 and 95°C for 2 to 3 seconds) and then cooled at +4°C ("flash" refrigeration) for packaging.

A refrigerated distribution network (less than 7°C) must be used, and the shelf-life is limited to 2 to 4 weeks only. Shorter periods can be indicated in order to stimulate product sales (8 days as in the case of pasteurised milk).

Advantages:


Excellent natural tasting product, closest to fresh fruit juice

Possibility of low capacity processing plant (less than 1 000 litres per day)

Initial investment in machinery adapted to small projects with low output

Disadvantages:


Refrigerated distribution network often non-existent in Africa (to be created)

Initial investment to be made in a cold room and a refrigerated vehicle

Obligation to work with fresh fruit imposes seasonal production schedule