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close this bookCylindrical Turning and Face Turning - Course: Techniques for Machining of Material. Trainees' Handbook of Lessons
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1. Objectives and purpose of cylindrical turning and facing
View the document2. Design and types of turning tools
View the document3. Preparation of cylindrical turning and facing
View the document4. Main movements for cylindrical turning and facing
View the document5. Cylindrical turning and facing of simple cylindrical parts
View the document6. Cylindrical turning and facing of shouldered cylindrical parts
View the document7. Cylindrical turning and facing of long cylindrical parts
View the document8. Cylindrical turning and facing of hollow cylindrical parts

5. Cylindrical turning and facing of simple cylindrical parts

Simple cylindrical parts can be machined with the part held in a chuck without counter-support or between centres. The cutting is done on the circumferential surface or end face of the part.

- The part may be clamped in a three-jaw chuck but also between centres. In case of short locating faces (chuck), firm chucking is essential


Figure 19 Three-jaw chuck

1 turning jaws
2 boring jaws


Figure 20 Turning between centres using length blocks

1 parts to be machined,
2 tool,
3 length block,
4 end stop,
5 machining length and length-block length

- The cutting process may be a combined operation (cylindrical turning and facing) using one cutting tool only (right-hand side-cutting tool) or an individual operation using the side-cutting tool or roughing tool.

The central position of the turning tool in line with the axis of rotation is to be ensured.

- Undue radial and axial run-out (concentricity check as per Fig. 21) can be compensated by turning out the chuck jaws.


Figure 21 Concentricity check with dial gauge

- For hollow parts with hard incrustation it is recommended to move the turning tool from the inside outwards when facing (see Fig. 17).

To prevent accidents, the bed stop is to be set prior to machining so as to avoid any possible collision between the cutting tool and rotating chuck jaws (see Fig. 20).