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close this bookCarpentry for Vocational Schools - A Teachers Handbook
close this folder23. STAIRS
View the document(introduction...)
View the document23.1. Technical terms of a stair
View the document23.2. Parts of a stair
View the document23.3. Calculating the number and size of steps
View the document23.4. Calculating the width of the stringers
View the document23.5. Marking out stringers
View the document23.6. Marking out top and bottom end of stringers
View the document23.7. Joining and assembling stairs
View the document23.8. Fixing stairs
View the document23.9. External stairs
View the document23.10. Concrete stairs

23.5. Marking out stringers

a) Gauging the "nosing line": - The nosing line is gauged 40 mm below the stringer-top with a combination square.


Figure

b) Gauging the "setting out line":

- On a steel square, you mark the depth of the going on the blade and the height of the rise on the tongue.


Figure

- The steel square is placed with the rise and the going position on the nosing line. Then measure the depth of the nosing in a right angle from the nosing line and mark it.


Figure

- Also the setting out line is gauged with a combination square along the stringer.


Figure

c) Marking out the "face-lines" of tread and riser: - A fence is now attached to the steel square. The riser height and the tread depth-marks on the square must be placed on the setting out line. The fence enables tread and riser lines to be repeated accurately. The face-lines of tread and riser are marked out by sliding the square along the stringer.


Figure

d) Marking out the thickness of tread and riser:

- This is done with templates made of plywood with the exact thickness and width of riser and tread.

- The tread-template is held below the face-line of the tread with the corner meeting the nosing line.


Figure

- The riser-template is held inside the face line of the riser meeting the bottom line of the tread.


Figure