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close this book Food Composition Data: A User's Perspective (1987)
close this folder Other considerations
close this folder Consideration of food composition variability: What is the variance of the estimate of one-day intakes? Implications for setting priorities
View the document (introductory text)
View the document Introduction
View the document Magnitude of the reported variability of composition
View the document Impact of composition variation on a one-day food intake
View the document Additional impact of a random error in intake estimation
View the document Some implications for data analyses
View the document Validation of food intake data: implications of food composition variation
View the document Systematic errors in food composition data
View the document Relevance to priorities for food composition data
View the document Conclusions
View the document References

Systematic errors in food composition data

Systematic errors in food composition data

The effects described in table 9 and discussed in the foregoing text are to be distinguished from a bias in the estimates of average intake for the group of subjects. If statistically significant differences between estimated and determined intakes are found, it is suggestive of systematic bias in either the food composition table or in the estimation of food intake. (The latter may be dismissed if food composites have been based on reported intake rather than being true duplicate meals. Both approaches to validation of food intake have been used. Building food composites from reported diets can be seen as a test of the validity of food composition tables. In this case the biological variability of individual samples of food should be considered in interpreting results. )

Any source of systematic error in food composition data will, of course, lead to a bias in the estimate of intake.

To consider the import of improving the food composition data base on data analyses involving regression or correlation analyses, it is necessary to consider concurrently the other error sources that may be present in the nutrient-intake estimates. It is necessary to recognize also that no matter how much the data base may be improved, there will always remain a biologic variability of composition among individual samples of foods. This will ultimately prove to be the limiting factor in improving the composition data base.