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close this book Food Composition Data: A User's Perspective (1987)
close this folder Other considerations
close this folder Systems considerations in the design of INFOODS
View the document (introductory text)
View the document Introduction
View the document Staff turnover and system growth
View the document Documentation
View the document The choice of environmental and basic tools
View the document Choices of operating systems
View the document Choice of programming language
View the document User interface
View the document Data representations
View the document System architecture and linkages
View the document Stability
View the document Primitive tool-based systems
View the document Summary
View the document References

Staff turnover and system growth

Staff turnover and system growth

The planning of large systems requires consideration of a future in which most of the members of the development group will change by the time the system is in active and productive use. By the time the system is ready for demonstration, many of the development staff will have departed, although the designers may well still be around. This implies that careful attention must be paid to how additions and modifications to the system will be made and how the system will be extended in the future either by the users or the design group. With the typical system design, there are benefits from building special tools to aid in system construction, integration, and testing. It is often useful to expend some effort to define and delimit the framework of the proposed system - its boundaries, fundamental structure, and relationship to the outside world. How much time and effort can and should be spent in these areas becomes another critical choice. This choice is complicated by the knowledge that what is appropriate for a central staff to do in developing a system may not be appropriate for a staff later on (especially one that is administratively or geographically dispersed) and may not be appropriate when users try to create their own extensions.