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close this book Tools for teaching - A visual aids workshop, and instruction manual for health educators
close this folder Session 1. Introduction to the visual aids workshop
View the document Illustration 1.1.1 - Learning chart (Supplementary learning materials)
View the document Story 1.1.2 - The blind men & the elephant (Supplementary learning materials)
View the document Illustration 1.1.3 - The blind men & the elephant (Supplementary learning materials)
View the document Illustration 1.1.4 - Double arrows (Supplementary learning materials)
View the document Illustration 1.1.5 - Faces/vase ambiguity (Supplementary learning materials)
Open this folder and view contents Handout 1.4.1 - Principles of communication design (Supplementary learning materials)
Open this folder and view contents Handout 1.8.1 Making & using visual aids (Supplementary learning materials)
View the document 1.1 Orientation to class structure & methods
View the document 1.2 Types of visual aids: A survey
View the document 1.3 Media & techniques: An overview
View the document 1.4 Design considerations
View the document 1.5 The design process
View the document 1.6 Project assignments
View the document 1.7 Master plan
View the document 1.8 Homework assignment: Idea generation

Story 1.1.2 - The blind men & the elephant (Supplementary learning materials)

Three blind men were walking through the jungle one day when they chanced to meet an elephant. It was their first encounter with such an animal and they were anxious to understand the nature of the beast. The first blind man grabbed the elephant's trunk. "An elephant is just like a big snake," he exclaimed, "long and round and sinuous."

"You are quite mistaken," contradicted the second blind man as he placed his two hands flat against the elephant's side. "An elephant is like the side of a house, broad and flat."

"You are both wrong," said the third blind man who was hanging on to the animal's tail. "An elephant is exactly like a piece of rope. I am sure of this because I am holding it in my hand."

And so they continued through the jungle, each man convinced that he alone understood the true nature of the elephant.