Cover Image
close this book Tools for teaching - A visual aids workshop, and instruction manual for health educators
close this folder Session 1. Introduction to the visual aids workshop
View the document Illustration 1.1.1 - Learning chart (Supplementary learning materials)
View the document Story 1.1.2 - The blind men & the elephant (Supplementary learning materials)
View the document Illustration 1.1.3 - The blind men & the elephant (Supplementary learning materials)
View the document Illustration 1.1.4 - Double arrows (Supplementary learning materials)
View the document Illustration 1.1.5 - Faces/vase ambiguity (Supplementary learning materials)
Open this folder and view contents Handout 1.4.1 - Principles of communication design (Supplementary learning materials)
Open this folder and view contents Handout 1.8.1 Making & using visual aids (Supplementary learning materials)
View the document 1.1 Orientation to class structure & methods
View the document 1.2 Types of visual aids: A survey
View the document 1.3 Media & techniques: An overview
View the document 1.4 Design considerations
View the document 1.5 The design process
View the document 1.6 Project assignments
View the document 1.7 Master plan
View the document 1.8 Homework assignment: Idea generation

1.2 Types of visual aids: A survey

30 Minutes

PROCEDURE

1) Ask participants to define "visual educational aid".

2) Ask them to name as many examples of visual educational aids as they can think of. A volunteer should list these on a large piece of newsprint taped to the wall. The list should include:

• chalk board

• flip charts

• posters

• brochures

• comics

• diagrams

• card games

• board games

• cut-outs

• flash cards

• flannelboard

• charts

• puppets

• masks

• models

• film strips

• slides

• videotapes

3) Explain that the emphasis in this workshop is on the construction and use of low-cost, low-tech visual aids. Although slide presentations, film strips, and videotapes are valuable tools for the health educator, we are going to concentrate our efforts on less-expensive materials that are simple to produce.

4) Pass around (or display) examples of visual aids that can be used by health educators.

5) Ask the class to brainstorm/discuss scenarios in which these visual educational aids might be used to advantage in promoting health issues amongst different audiences.

For example:

• a puppet show on dental health/hygiene presented to elementary school children

• recipe cards or pamphlets handed out to mothers following a nutrition class

• flip chart discussion about different methods of toilet construction at a barangay council meeting

• a diagram of a garden layout presented to community members in conjunction with a discussion of alternative sources of nutritional food

• the use of masks/role play to encourage barrio residence to discuss the social and economic causes of their health problems