Cover Image
close this book Forestry training manual for the Africa region
View the document Acknowledgements
View the document Trainee guidelines
Open this folder and view contents Training program overview
Open this folder and view contents Conducting the training program
Open this folder and view contents Presenting the sessions
View the document Words about transition
View the document Session 1 : Welcome, expectations, and evaluation criteria
View the document Session 2 : Special projects
View the document Session 3 : The forests of the world, peace corps' forestry goals, the individual volunteer's role
View the document Session 4 : Record keeping - group process
View the document Session 5 : Video tapes
View the document Session 6 : Agro-forestry data collection
View the document Session 7 : Feedback
View the document Session 8 : Flowers, seeds, the beginning
View the document Session 9 : Nutrition
View the document Session 10 : Non-verbal communication
View the document Session 11 : Germination
View the document Session 12 : Coping skills
View the document Session 13 : Basic site selection, planning & layout of a nursery
View the document Session 14 : Review of trainees' nursery plan
View the document Session 15 communication through illustration
View the document Session 16 : Soil preparation, seedbed sowing
View the document Session 17 : Individual interviews
View the document Session 18 : Reproduction by clippings and nursery review
View the document Session 19 : Introduction to extension
View the document Session 20 : Protection and record keeping (Insect collection)
View the document Session 20A : Chicken preparation
View the document Session 21 : The volunteers' role as an extensionist
View the document Session 22 : Tropical horticulture: care, tending and disease control
View the document Session 23 : Women in development - part I
View the document Session 24 : Team building
View the document Session 25 : Building and using a rustic transit
View the document Session 26 : Women in development - part II
View the document Session 27 : Working with groups as an extension worker
View the document Session 28 : Trees: identification & planting
View the document Session 29 : Lesson plan and use of visual aids in teaching
View the document Session 30 : The ugly American
View the document Session 31 : Catchments - sowing of seedlings into catchments
View the document Session 32 : Weekly interview
View the document Session 33 : Agro-forestry
View the document Session 34 : Community analysis introduction
View the document Session 35 : Soils
View the document Session 36 : Community analysis
View the document Session 37 : Irrigation
View the document Session 38 : Review of expectations - mid-way
View the document Session 39 : Problem analysis
View the document Session 40 : Soil erosion
View the document Session 41 : Species report - research demonstration
View the document Session 42 : Cultural values
View the document Session 43 : Wellbeing
View the document Session 44 : Field trip overview
View the document Session 45 : Agro-forestry reports
View the document Session 46 : Weekly interview
View the document Session 47 : Leave on week-long field trip
View the document Session 48 : Pesticides
View the document Session 49 : Review of field trips
View the document Session 50 : Resources
View the document Session 51 : Area measurement, pacing, compass use
View the document Session 52 : Compost heap - greenhouse construction - germination percentage
View the document Session 53 : Culture shock
View the document Session 54 : Range management
View the document Session 55 : Grafting and fruit trees
View the document Session 56 : Professional approaches to interaction with host country officials
View the document Session 57 : Project planning: goal setting
View the document Session 58 : Final interviews
View the document Session 59 : Ecology teams presentations
View the document Session 60 : Graduation

Session 7 : Feedback

Total time 1 hour

Goals

- To review how to give and receive feedback,

- To learn more about ourselves,

- To become more skillful in obtaining and understanding information about the effectiveness of our behavior,

- To become more sensitive to our reactions to others and the consequences of these reactions.

Overview

In this session, the trainees are given exposure to established methods of sending and receiving feedback. The positive and negative impact feedback can have on a Volunteers' service is covered during this session.

Exercise

1. Feedback

Materials

Flip charts, marker pens, tape.

Exercise 1 Feedback

Total time 1 hour

Overview

The purpose of this exercise is to remind the participants that although they may have had lectures and some practice in feedback, skillful feedback needs to be practiced.

Procedures

Activities

1. The trainer should acknowledge that all of the trainees have been through feedback practice at the CAST, CREST, or Staging and that many may have had an earlier introduction to feedback.

Time

5 minutes

Activities

2. He/she asks the individuals to jot down as many feedback rules as they can remember.

Time

5 minutes

Activities

3. The trainer produces a newsprint with the following rules:

Time

15 minutes

FEEDBACK RULES

A. It is honest and frank rather than diplomatic or subtle. It is true reporting of your real feelings and reactions to the behavior of another person. This implies that you are aware of your reactions and are willing to run the risk of possible rejection by sharing them with the other person.

B. It is specific rather than general. To be told that one is dominating will probably not be as useful as to be told that: "Just now you were not listening to what the others said, but I felt I had to agree with your arguments or face attack from you. ยท1

C. It is focused on behavior rather than on the person. It is important that we refer to what a person does rather than to what we think or imagine he is. Thus we might say that a person "talked more than anyone else in this meeting" rather than that he is a "loudmouth". The former allows for the possibility of change; the latter implies a fixed personality trait.

D. It takes into account the needs of the receiver of feedback. Feedback can be destructive when it serves only our own needs and fails to consider the needs of the person on the receiving end. It should be given to help, not hurt. We too often give feedback because it makes us feel better or gives us a psychological advantage.

E. It is directed toward behavior about which the receiver can do something. Frustration is only increased when a person is reminded of some shortcomings over which he has no control or a physical characteristic about which he can do nothing.

F. It is solicited, rather than imposed. Feedback is most useful when the receiver himself has formulated the kind of question which one can answer either by observing him or through actively seeking (soliciting) feedback.

G. It involves sharing of information rather than giving advice. By sharing information, we leave a person free to decide for himself, in accordance with his own goals, needs, etc. When we give advice we tell him what to do, and to some degree take away his freedom to decide for himself.

H. It is well-timed. In general, immediate feedback is most useful (depending of course, upon the person's readiness to hear it, support available from others, etc.). The reception and use of feedback involves many possible emotional reactions. Excellent feedback presented at an inappropriate time may do more harm than good.

I. It involves the amount of information that receiver can use rather than the amount we would like to give. To overload a person with feedback is to reduce the possibility that he may be able to use what he receives effectively. When we give more than can be used, we are more often than not satisfying some need of our own rather than helping the other person.

J. It concerns what is said or done, or how, not why. The "why" takes us from the observable to the inferred a involves assumptions regarding motive or intent. Telling a person what his motivations or intentions are more often than not tends to alienate the person, and contributes to a climate of resentment, suspicion, and distrusts it does not contribute to learning or development. It is dangerous to assume that we know why a parson says or doss something, or what he "really" means, or what he is "really" trying to accomplish. If we are uncertain of his motives or intent, this uncertainty in itself is feedback and should be revealed.

K. It is checked to insure clear communication. One way of doing this is to have the receiver try to rephrase the feedback he has received to see if it corresponds to what the Bender had in mind. No matter what the intent, feedback is often threatening and thus subject to considerable distortion or misinterpretation.

Activities

4. The trainer gives the following reasons why we want to practice and become more skillful at giving and receiving feedback.

A. By learning to give and receive feedback skillfully, we help ourselves and others become more effective Volunteers.

B. The more we learn about ourselves in this training and how effective our behavior is, the more we will be prepared for our two years as Volunteers.

C. We will also become more sensitive to our reactions to others and the consequences of these reactions in our interpersonal relationships.

Time

5 minutes

Activities

5. The trainer asks the group to break into group. of five and brainstorm ways in which we can become more skillful at giving and receiving feedback and fiat ideas on newsprint.

Time

15 minutes

Activities

6. The trainer asks the groups to present their fiat to the entire group. 7. By way of summarizing, two trainer models for giving and receiving feedback through short role plays are used. The, feedback should be real, perhaps based upon the record keeping exercise in which the trainees took part. This would help set a climate of openness. It is also important to model positive feedback.

Time

15 minutes