Cover Image
close this book Wind systems for pumping water: A training manual
View the document Acknowledgments
View the document Introduction to training
View the document Training guidelines
View the document Objectives for wind system construction training
View the document Session 1 Introduction and objectives
View the document Session 2 History of wind systems
View the document Session 3 Large projects and community analysis
View the document Session 4 Shop safety and tool care
View the document Session 5 Representative drawings for construction
View the document Session 6 Shafts and bearings
View the document Session 7 Strengths and testing
View the document Session 8 Joinery
View the document Session 9 Pumps and pump design
View the document Session 10 Siting considerations
View the document Session 11 Sizing wind water pumping systems
View the document Session 12 Design considerations for pumps and windmills
View the document Session 13 How to design
View the document Session 14 Presentation of designs
View the document Session 15 Construction of wind measuring poles
View the document Session 16 Exportation for wind sites
View the document Session 17 Tower raising
View the document Session 18 Plumbing the wind system
View the document Session 19 Testing installed wind system
View the document Session 20 Presentation of projects
View the document Session 21 Maintenance - preventive and routine
View the document Bibliography
View the document Construction materials list
View the document Tool list for 24 participants
View the document Technical vocabulary
View the document Report on the wind-powered in-service training
View the document Recommendations

Session 15 Construction of wind measuring poles

TOTAL TIME: 2 Hours

OBJECTIVES: To construct several wind measuring devices

To calibrate these devices

To discuss some of the variables regarding wind measurement

MATERIALS: 20 foot (7 meter) or longer light poles or bamboo, ball of red or brightly colored yarn, small beads or nuts of about the same weight, fastenings (nails, lashing material)

PROCEDURES:

Step 1: 5 minutes

Discuss difficulties involved in measuring the wind speed and frequency (daily and seasonal changes, height above ground, etc.)

Step 2: 20 minutes

Discuss ways to measure the wind velocities, anemometers, wet fingers, kites, effect on the trees and buildings, wind pole, bubbles.

Trainer Note

Have everyone become familiar with the Beaufort scale. During training have people guess the wind speed and then check it, using the Beaufort scale, in order to improve their estimation abilities.

Step 3: 5 minutes

Explain the construction of the wind measuring pole.

Step 4: 1 hour

Break up into construction groups. Each group should build a measuring pole. If poles are of significantly different lengths or are used at different elevations the resulting wind velocities can be compared.

Step 5: 30 minutes

Examine and "calibrate" each pole and then use them to measure wind speeds.

RESOURCES: Copies of Attachment 15-A

Anemometer of some type

Attachment 15-A

Construction of Wind Measuring Poles

THE BEAUFORT SCALE OF WIND SPEEDS

Beaufort No.

Description

Miles/Hour

Kilom/Hour

Effect

0

Calm

0

0

Still: smoke rises vertically

1

Light air

1-3

1-5

Smoke drifts

2

Light breeze

4-7

6-11

Wind felt on face, leaves rustle.

3

Gentle breeze

8-12

12-19

Leaves & small twigs move constantly, streamer extended.

4

Moderate breeze

13-18

20-29

Raises dust & papers moves twigs & thin branches.

5

Fresh breeze

19-24

30-38

Small trees in leaf begin to sway.

6

Strong wind

25-31

39-50

Large branches move, overhead, wires whistle, umbrellas hard to control.

7

Moderate gale

32-38

51-61

Whole trees move, offers some resistance to walker.

8

Fresh gale

39-46

62-74

Twigs break off trees, hard to walk.

9

Strong gale

47-54

75-86

Blows off roof shingles

10

Whole gale

55-63

87-100

Trees uprooted, much structural damage.

11

Storm

64-72

101-115

Widespread damage (rare inland)