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close this book Needless hunger: voices from a Bangladesh village
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Needless hunger: voices from a Bangladesh village

Betsy Hartmann

James K. Boyce

IFDP

INSTITUTE FOR FOOD AND DEVELOPMENT POLICY

145 NINTH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94103 U.S.A. (415) 864-8555

Hartmann, Betsy.

Needless hunger: voices from a Bangladesh village/Betsy Hartmann, James K. Boyce-San Francisco, Calif.: Institute for Food and Development Policy. c1979.

Bibliography: P. 66-68

1. Food supply - Bangladesh. 2. Hunger. 3. Agriculture - Bangladesh. 4. Bangladesh-Rural conditions. 1. Boyce, James K., joint author. II. Institute for Food and Development Policy, San Francisco. III. Title.

HD9016.B352H37

338,195492-dc19

80-142853

ISBN: 0-935028-03-X

© 1979, 1982 by Institute for Food and Development Policy

Second printing, revised: January 1982; Third printing, 1987

To order additional copies, call or write:

Institute for Food and Development Policy

145 Ninth Street

San Francisco, CA 94103 USA

(415) 864-8555

Please add 15 percent for postage and handling ($1 minimum). Bulk discounts available.

Distributed in United Kingdom by:

Third World Publications

151 Stratford Road

Birmingham B11 1RD

England

Cover photo by Hartmann/Boyce. Designed by Barbara Garza

Map

Formerly East Pakistan, Bangladesh was founded in 1971 following the Bengali revolt against Pakistan. Officially known as Gana Prajatantri Bangladesh (People's Republic of Bangladesh) and lying in the delta of the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers, Bangladesh is 55,126 square miles (142,776 square kilometers) in area, approximately the size of Wisconsin. Bangladesh is the fourth largest agricultural society in the world: 90 percent of its 83 million people are rural and 80 percent depend directly upon agriculture as a livelihood. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, "Bangladesh is possibly the richest country in the world as far as inland fishery resources are concerned."