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close this book Agricultural development workers training manual: Volume II Extension Skills
close this folder Chapter III: Extension resources
View the document HANDOUT II - 3 - A - Information gathering strategy
Open this folder and view contents HANDOUT III - 1 - A - Foreign volunteer services: A host national perspective
View the document HANDOUT III - 1 - B - Assumptions about development
View the document HANDOUT III - 2 - A - Case study
View the document HANDOUT III - 2 - B - A peace corps agriculture extension worker
View the document HANDOUT III - 2 - C - Questions for discussion: Assumptions
View the document HANDOUT III - 2 - D - Effects of the project
View the document HANDOUT III - 2 - E - Different approaches
Open this folder and view contents HANDOUT III - 3 - A - The adverse impact of development on women
View the document HANDOUT III - 3 - B - Cross cultural attitude survey
View the document HANDOUT III - 3 - C - Women of the world: The facts
View the document HANDOUT III - 4 - A - Working style inventory
View the document HANDOUT IV - 1 - A - Agriculture extension
View the document HANDOUT IV - 2 - A - Extension worker roles and their implications
View the document HANDOUT IV - 2 - B - Extension, training and dialogue: A new approach for tanzania
View the document HANDOUT IV - 3 - A - Reaching small farmers (role play)
Open this folder and view contents HANDOUT IV - 3 - B - Extension guidelines
View the document HANDOUT IV - 5 - A - The result demo plot as an extension tool
Open this folder and view contents HANDOUT IV - 6 - A - The use of the method demonstration as a teaching device
View the document HANDOUT IV - 7 - A - Participative & directive training styles
View the document HANDOUT IV - 9 - A - Meetings
View the document HANDOUT IV - 11 - A - Field day check chart
View the document HANDOUT IV - 12 - A - Working within the system
View the document HANDOUT V - 1 - A - Some diseases which are found in Latin America (categorized in terms of how they are transmitted)
View the document HANDOUT V - 1 - A - Mini- workshops (summary of needed materials)
View the document HANDOUT V - 2 - B - Guidelines for purifying water
View the document HANDOUT V - 2 - C - Basic guidelines for personal and dental health
View the document HANDOUT V - 2 - D - Basic information concerning solid waste and excreta disposal
View the document HANDOUT V - 2 - E - Guidelines for assuring foods are clean
View the document HANDOUT V - 2 - F - Basic handout on immunization
View the document HANDOUT V - 2 - G - Antibody creation
View the document HANDOUT V - 3 - A - Description of the three main food groups
View the document HANDOUT V - 3 - B - Requirements, tables, and lists of nutrients & food
View the document HANDOUT VI - 1 - A - Personal stabilizers
View the document HANDOUT VI - 3 - A - Case situation # 1
View the document HANDOUT VII - 1 - A - Group maintenance oriented behavior worksheet
View the document HANDOUT VII - 1 - B - Task oriented behavior worksheet
View the document HANDOUT VII - 1 - C - Observers worksheet
View the document HANDOUT VII - 1 - D - Task oriented behavior/Group maintenance oriented behavior
View the document HANDOUT VII - 1 - E - On U.S. volunteers
View the document HANDOUT VII - 1 - F - Communication skills: Self rating form
View the document HANDOUT VII - 2 - A - The decision- making process
View the document HANDOUT VII - 2 - B - Observation sheet for decision making
View the document HANDOUT VII - 2 - C - A group decision making model
View the document HANDOUT VII - 3 - A - Personal interest
View the document HANDOUT VII - 3 - B - Transferring responsibility
View the document HANDOUT VII - 4 - A - Problem- solving
View the document HANDOUT VII - 4 - B - Patty peace corps
View the document HANDOUT VII - 4 - C - Situation
View the document HANDOUT VII - 4 - D - Case study of a head bund
View the document HANDOUT VII - 4 - E - Management

HANDOUT V - 2 - E - Guidelines for assuring foods are clean

Some Illnesses are Caused by Unclean Foods/ Foods Which Carry Disease- Causing organisms

FOODS USUALLY INVOLVED

WAYS TO PREVENT SPREAD BY FOOD

Raw fruits ant vegetables contaminated by duet, flies, water, soil, night soil fertilizer

Wash thoroughly with Lugol's solution (see next page for a description of Lugol's solution); remove peels; cook thoroughly if possible

Raw or undercooked meats and meat products.

Cook these foods thoroughly Cook garbage fad to swine. Get rid of rata in hog lots

Cracked or dirty eggs contaminated with poultry Excreta meat meal, bone meal, or fish meal Poultry meat contaminated by unsanitary handling.

Use only clean eggs with sound shells Soiled eggs should be washed. Handle poultry meat and eggs under clean conditions Store them in a cold place Cook thoroughly ant refrigerate if not eaten at once After handling rev eggs or poultry, wash your hands thoroughly

Home canned foods, or some commercially prepared foods

Cook canned meat and vegetables thoroughly before serving Boll 15 minutes and stir to make aura you heat all parts.

Moist or prepared foods, milk, other dairy products or water contaminated with Excreta

Strict personal cleanliness in foot preparation: keeping moist foods cool during storage, periods; cooking foods before serving; getting rid of files a Persons with dysentery should not handle food Dispose of human west’s safely.

Raw contaminated milk, dairy products, or meat

Get rid of brucellosis from livestock by vaccinating young animals and slaughtering infected older animals. Boil milk used to drink or to make other dairy products.

Milk Contaminated by human a with the illness.

Make the milk safe a by boiling . Search f or the person carrying the illness and isolate him from other people.

Foods contaminated by a discharge from the mouth or nose of a person who has disease germs in his body, whether he is sick, about to at sick, or immune

Boil milk used for drinking or to make other dairy products Keep persons with the disease from handling food. Separate then from other people.

Milk from cove with udder Satisfactions caused by these organisms.

 

General Guidelines for Food Purchasing, Storage, Preparation, and Serving

When you purchase, prepare and serve food it la important to'

- select good quality food. Food should smell fresh, come from a clean source, be protected from files and dirt, and have a fresh attractive look and color

- keep yourself clean

- keep dishes and equipment clean

- keep the cooking and eating area clean

Food can become unsafe to eat if it la

- served by a person carrying disease germs

- served in soiled dishes

- eaten with dirty utensils and hands

Keep everything clean Cleanliness helps to keep away disease germs. clean food la likely to be safe food.

When preparing foods:

- store them for a very short time

- prepare in clean containers

- cook thoroughly

- serve immediately

- don't save leftovers unless you can put them in clean, covered containers in a cool place

Lugol’s Solution:

This la an iodine compound which is an effective disinfectant and la available at most pharmacies. The solution should contain 5% iodine or 50,000 ppm when purchased it should be kept in a brown glass bottle; light in the presence of air will destroy the iodine very rapidly if it 18 kept in a clear glass container The concentration will decrease in a brown bottle also, but such slower Lugol's should prevent a bright light from passing through the bottle ant solution and a person should not be able to see the bottom of a tablespoon full of Lugol's when held in a brightly lit room. If these two criteria aren't met than the Lugol's la weak and the amount used oust be increased.

In using Lugol's, the following dilution schedule should be followed:

1 If Lugol's solution appears dark ant is used within one month of the date of purchase, add five tablespoons to every four liters of water.

2 If Lugol's solution appears dark brown and la not used within one month of the data of purchase, increase the amount by one tablespoon par month after the first month of purchase. For example, during the first month after purchase, use five tablespoons and during the second month use sex tablespoons

3 If Lugol's allows light to pass through it, do not use it; purchase a good bottle

4 Always alloy vegetables a contact time of 20 minutes with "good" Lugol's Keep it in a cool, dark place

5. The above schedule can also be used with chlorox.